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(On the making of tea) Ayaz Ahmed Khan: Alan Jones: AAK:

Oh, maybe granule isn't the right word. Tea does come ... my best. How do you, by the way, make tea?

The water is boiled in a kettle used for no purpose other than heating plain water. The tea pot is ... Some people, including me, often put the milk in the cup first, but others regard that as a vulgar procedure.

Ah. That's called a sieve. Good.
I rarely use tea pots at home. Instead, I add the tea into the boiling water in the kettle, and pour the tea from the kettle into the cups, almost always filtering with a sieve. Putting the milk in the cup is the next-to-last action I perform, followed by putting the sugar to sweeten the tea.
Just one further point - about these "granules". That sounds like the "crumbs" which are one of the forms of ... and recognisable as the leaves of a plant, especially the most expensive kinds intended to be used as loose tea.

Oh, I don't know, Alan. How small are 'small leaves'? If an alien someone who knows absolutely nothing about tea, neither the word, nor what it is was given to look at the jar I keep my tea in, he wouldn't recognise them as leaves or anything closely resembling leaves. It's exactly what you get when you pick up a dead leaf, and crush it in your palm so much so that the resulting mixture does not look anything like a leaf. That would be exactly how the tea I use look like. However, I have not seen tea in the form of leaves used, but only in pulverised form.

Ayaz Ahmed Khan
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Oh, maybe granule isn't the right word. Tea does come ... one for keeping tea, and look at it from above.

I think the word you're looking for is "flakes". To me among the terms for fragments of material "granule" implies ... fairly flat in appearance (unless they've been "ground" or "powdered", not usually done with 'real' tea, rather than just "crushed").

Perhaps you are right. But, having looked at the jar twice already, I still think they look like small, irregular particles that tranform into even smaller pieces with a crunch-like sound on the slight touch of the fingers. The brand we prefer most is Lipton, and it comes in packs of varied sizes. Inside the packs are silver-coloured bags that contain the tea in what appears to me to be a granular form.

Ayaz Ahmed Khan
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"Alan Jones" typed:

AAK:
..Then, if necessary using a sieve just as you describe ... the cup and sugar and milk added if liked. >

AAK:
Ah. That's called a sieve. Good.

What you described is a sieve, and a small one works well for tea, but the thing normally used in UK is a specially-made "tea strainer". This is not usually made of wire gauze, but is like a deep circular spoon, or even shaped as a cone, with many small holes drilled in it. The strainer has an extension opposite the handle so that it can be balanced safely on a cup while the tea is poured. The fineness of gauze is not required to catch the larger tea-leaves we tend to prefer. The tea-leaves in a tea-bag are smaller; perhaps the importers save the larger bits for loose tea and relegate the finer ones, almost dust, for the bags.

Alan Jones
... bags that contain the tea in what appears to me to be a granular form.

I think the word "granule" would have been accepted without question until a few years ago as a good description of the small particles of crushed leaf that are found in teas like Lipton's. Nowadays, though, one can buy "instant tea granules" which dissolve completely in hot water (and which generally yield a liquid only vaguely reminiscent of tea), so the term "granule" for leaf tea has become slightly misleading.
Interesting to note, by the way, that "Lipton's" is the name almost always associated with English-style leaf tea throughout the world except in England, where it was once common but has all but disappeared.
Cheers,
Daniel.
... bags that contain the tea in what appears to me to be a granular form.

I think the word "granule" would have been accepted without question until a few years ago as a good description ... generally yield a liquid only vaguely reminiscent of tea), so the term "granule" for leaf tea has become slightly misleading.

Instant tea granules. I had not heard of that. I know that coffee has granules that dissolve completely in hot water, but tea.
Interesting to note, by the way, that "Lipton's" is the name almost always associated with English-style leaf tea throughout the world except in England, where it was once common but has all but disappeared.

Interesting, though I noticed the word London on the front-face of one of the box of Lipton tea I have.

Ayaz Ahmed Khan
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I think the word "granule" would have been accepted without ... the term "granule" for leaf tea has become slightly misleading.

Instant tea granules. I had not heard of that. I know that coffee has granules that dissolve completely in hot water, but tea.

Although hot tea can be made with instant tea powder I can't think of any instant tea product that I would describe as being composed of "granules it is usually used to make iced tea, that is, the tea is dissolved in cold water and ice is added. Iced coffee can similarly be made with instant coffee powder or granules.
Interesting to note, by the way, that "Lipton's" is the ... where it was once common but has all but disappeared.

Interesting, though I noticed the word London on the front-face of one of the box of Lipton tea I have.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
Although hot tea can be made with instant tea powder I can't think of any instant tea product that I would ... dissolved in cold water and ice is added. Iced coffee can similarly be made with instant coffee powder or granules.

Both tea drinkers and linguists might say:

1. Tea does not dissolve: the tea leaves (orfragments) persist: but they infuse the water.

2. Iced tea is usually made in two ways: making hot tea (with boiling water) and cooling it; infusing tea in cold water over a long time (hours) and serving it cold when strong enough to taste.

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs (Ottawa, Canada)
Instant tea granules. I had not heard of that. I know that coffee has granules that dissolve completely in hot water, but tea.

It's true, though. The result is not especially nice so instant tea is not very common.
As Raymond says, there are also instant tea preparations that are intended to be used to make iced tea ... which reminds me: the one form in which Lipton's teas are commonly found in the UK is as bottled or tinned read-to-drink tea-based drinks.
... I noticed the word London on the front-face of one of the box of Lipton tea I have.

Googling for "Lipton" and feeling lucky takes one to www.lipton.com, which turns out to be a US-based website run by "Unilever Bestfoods".
Sir Thomas Lipton himself was a scot, from Glasgow, and although his company was based in at first in Glasgow and later in London many of his business interests were US-based. I found links that seem to be broken to a biography on the lipton website, but this other one seems to work:
http://www.tartans.com/articles/famscots/thomaslipton.html

Of course, most of the worlds best tea is grown in Asia (though I've also had good African and Australian teas) so it seems ironic that you're buying it from Lipton's!
Cheers,
Daniel.
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Instant tea granules. I had not heard of that. I know that coffee has granules that dissolve completely in hot water, but tea.

Although hot tea can be made with instant tea powder I can't think of any instant tea product that I would ... dissolved in cold water and ice is added. Iced coffee can similarly be made with instant coffee powder or granules.

Neither have I. I have only heard of instant coffee , and had not heard of instant tea until Daniel mentioned.

Ayaz Ahmed Khan
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