+0
Hi

In a book written by a psychic there's a space where the reader is supposed to write about his/her private experience/answer the questions asked by the author etc. There's one chapter in the book which the auhtor entitled "The ugly duckling block". In this chapter she writes about people's blocks just because they feel like ugly ducklings and they think they shouldn't do some things for certain reasons etc.

And then, in that space at the end of the chapter where the reader is supposed to answer some questions the first headline is: For All You Ugly Ducklings: The Times You Felt Like A Quack. Please list three people you knew better not to trust ... and trusted anyway.

The second headline is: For All You Ugly Ducklings: The Times You Knew You Weren't A Quack. Please list three people you knew you could trust ...and you were right.

Do you have any idea what she means by: The times you felt like a quack AND The times you knew you weren't a quack.

As far as I know "a quack" is either a voice given by a duck or a person who is a charlatan.
Comments  
Your second choice is the correct one.

This assumes that you're already some kind of practioner, serving some sort of clientel.

A. You feel totally inadaquate to help person X, and you doubt yourself to the point where you think perhaps you really are a charlatan.

B. You feel confident, and know in your heart that you've helped person X.

As an aside, this sentence strikes me as either miscopied or incorrect:

Please list three people you knew better not to trust ... and trusted anyway.

The standard wording is "you knew better than to trust" OR "you knew not to trust."
This version reverses the meaning.
AvangiAs an aside, this sentence strikes me as either miscopied or incorrect:Please list three people you knew better not to trust ... and trusted anyway.The standard wording is "you knew better than to trust" OR "you knew not to trust."This version reverses the meaning.

Hi

In the original it was: you knew better than to trust ... but I changed it into "you knew better not to trust" as it is more understable to me, but wrong unfortunately Emotion: smile
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
In the US, children get used to that expression as an idiom.

(screaming) John! - You know better than that! Wait til your father gets home!

"Better than what?" you might ask.

"That" would typically be replaced by a present participial phrase, or an infinitive phrase:

Better than teasing your little sister!

Better than to write on the wall with my lipstick!
I have one more question.

Would it mean the same if I changed "For all you ugly ducklings" into "To all you ugly ducklings".

Would it mean the same?

I understand these words this way: I (speak) to all you ugly ducklings, tell me about the times you felt like a quack.

I'm just not sure if "for" and "to" would mean the same here? If this FOR has the same meaning as in "FOR you" then it sounds strange to me, at least for the time being Emotion: wink
We say, "This is addressed to you.''

And, "This is for you to fill out."
(We would NOT say, "This is to you to fill out.")

Although the instructions make it clear that the reader is supposed to do something, the choice of "for" emphasizes it.

"This is to all you people out there:" ("Listen to me. I'm talking to you.")

"This is for all you people out there:" ("Listen to me. I need your help." - or something like that.)

It's not set in stone. They could be swapped around. But I think "for" is more likely to imply that a response is requested. (Context would usually make it clear.)
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
So what it says is: IT's FOR all you ugly ducklings (meaning it refers to all you who consider themselves to be ugly ducklings). Am I correct?
NewguestSo what it says is: IT's FOR all you ugly ducklings (meaning it refers to all you who consider themselves to be ugly ducklings). Am I correct?
Yes. (This is a separate issue from the "to" vs. "for" issue.)
"Ugly duckling" is just her code for "charlatan." (quack)

she writes about people's blocks just because they feel like ugly ducklings

But she counters by reminding them that they don't ALWAYS feel that way.

I'm remembering the old Peter Paul's commercial: Sometimes you feel like a duck; sometimes you don't. (It's really "like a nut.")
Ok, thanks for all the replies!
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.