+0
What do the following sentences mean?

Clint Eastwood's movie The Eiger Sanction was partly filmed in Monument Valley. The "Totem Pole" feature has been off-bounds to climbers since the movie was filmed here.
1 2
Comments 
Climbers are not permitted to climb on the rock formation called the 'Totem Pole." ("Off-limits" could also be used.)
Jackson6612What do the following sentences mean?

Clint Eastwood's movie The Eiger Sanction was partly filmed in Monument Valley. The "Totem Pole" feature has been off-bounds to climbers since the movie was filmed here.

Hi,

Don't you think the sentence should have been:

The Totem Pole feature has been off-bounded to climbers...?
"Off-bounds" did sound strange to me, but "off-bounded" sounds even stranger. Actually, now that I think about it some more, I think it should have been either "off limits" or "out of bounds" -- I think the writer inadvertently blended those two phrases.
Khoff"Off-bounds" did sound strange to me, but "off-bounded" sounds even stranger. Actually, now that I think about it some more, I think it should have been either "off limits" or "out of bounds" -- I think the writer inadvertently blended those two phrases.
Hi,

I believe past participle should be used after has been in that sentence. Neither off-bounds nor off-limits is a past participle. I hope you will be able to understand my problem now.
Why does it have to be a past participle? How about an adjective? I realize that possible substitutions, such as "forbidden" or "closed" can be past participles, but in this sentence I think they would just function as adjectives. "Off-limits" is an adjective.
KhoffWhy does it have to be a past participle? How about an adjective? I realize that possible substitutions, such as "forbidden" or "closed" can be past participles, but in this senctence I think they would just function as adjectives. "Off-limits" is an adjective.
Hi Khoff,

That sentence is in passive voice, therefore it has to use only past participle. In my opinion, past participle functions both as a verb and an adjective. I still think that words such as off-limits and off-bounds should not be used.

Thanks a lot for helping me to this point. I hope you will also help me in the future. I wish you good health and many years of happiness.

Best wishes, Jackson
Hi, Jackson.

The "Totem Pole" feature has been off-bounds to climbers since the movie was filmed here.

That's the sentence we're talking about, right? I don't think it is in passive voice.

The area has been popular since the movie was filmed there.

The park has been famous since the movie was filmed there.

The Totem Pole has been off-limits since the movie was filmed there.

No passive voice. No past participles necessary. Adjectives are fine.

sincerely,

Khoff
Hi Jackson

The verb 'be' is frequently followed by an adjective. A past participle can function as an adjective. However, participles do not always function as adjectives in a sentence.

Saying "off-limited" or "off-bounded" is not possible since "off-limit" and "off-bound" are not verbs. The part of your sentence containing "off-bounds" is not a passive construction. That part of the sentence contains the present perfect form of the verb 'be' (active). In your sentence you need either off-limits or off-bounds.
Show more