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Which is correct?
If they are incorrect, what do you say?

#1 The traffic rules of my country prohibit crossing a street while its light is red.
#2 The traffic rules of my country prohibit crossing a street while the light is red.
#3 The traffic rules of my country prohibit crossing the street while its light is red.
#4 The traffic rules of my country prohibit crossing the street while the light is red.
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Not really. 'The street' is an expression commonly used to mean 'any street'.

Wooow!!
Shock!!
Unbelievable!!

But I know I have to believe it.

What's the difference between #9 and #10?

#9 a street (I think a street always means any street.)
#10 the street that means any street, not the specific street

So I think both means any street, in a simple or short expression.
But I think their nuances are different because their words are different. I think different words have different nuances.
What's the difference?
Hi,
What's the difference between #9 and #10?

#9 a street (I think a street always means any street.) Not always. See below.
#10 the street that means any street, not
the specific street

So I think both means any street, in a simple or short expression.
But I think their nuances are different because their words are different. I think different words have different nuances.
What's the difference?

You should always look both ways before you cross the street.
You should always look both ways before you cross a street.
I really see no difference here, except that the former sounds more idiomatic, and thus makes the speaker sound more natural.

Person A: Did you hear about Tom? He was killed crossing the street.
Person B: My god, that's terrible.
The focus above is wholely on Tom's death.

Person A: Did you hear about Tom? He was killed crossing a street.
Person B: My god, that's terrible. Which street?
The focus above is, of course, still on Tom's death, but the indefinite article in this context suggests to person B that A is or may be referring to a specific but previously unmentioned street. (eg A student walked in to class. The student was a woman.)

Learing about articles is challenging and frustrating, isn't it? Hard to learn, and also hard to teach.
Best wishes, Clive

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northwind#9 a street (I think a street always means any street.)
No. There are at least two different meanings. any street and a certain (specific but unidentified) street.
northwindI think different words have different nuances. What's the difference?
In this case, I think it's a matter of "to cross the street" being an idiomatic structure, somewhat like "to go to the bank" or "to take the bus", which are also cases where you don't focus on which specific bank or bus you mean, even though you obviously go to a specific bank or take a specific bus.
CJ
Person A: Did you hear about Tom? He was killed crossing the street.
Person B: My god, that's terrible.
The focus above is wholely on Tom's death.

Person A: Did you hear about Tom? He was killed crossing a street.
Person B: My god, that's terrible. Which street?
The focus above is, of course, still on Tom's death, but the indefinite article in this context suggests to person B that A is or may be referring to a specific but previously unmentioned street. (eg A student walked in to class. The student was a woman.)

I think I well understand this. I have no questions about this because this is about a thing that actually happend, not a general rule.

No. There are at least two different meanings. any street and a certain (specific but unidentified) street.

I think I well understand this. I have no questions.

In this case, I think it's a matter of "to cross the street" being an idiomatic structure, somewhat like "to go to the bank" or "to take the bus", which are also cases where you don't focus on which specific bank or bus you mean, even though you obviously go to a specific bank or take a specific bus.

Would you please let me put "to go to the bank" or "to take the bus" aside because they are too difficult for me to think of now?

I also well understand #7 and have no questions about #7.
The biggest question to me now is "the street" in #8.
#7 It's illegal in my country to cross a street against the light.
#8 It's illegal in my country to cross the street against the light.

I also well understand #11 and have no questions about #11.
The biggest question to me now is "the street" in #12.
#11 You should always look both ways before you cross a street.
#12 You should always look both ways before you cross the street.

I think the meanings or feelings of "the street" in #8 and #12 are the same or close.
In #8 and #12, the speaker is not telling about a specific street because he is telling about general rules. So I think "the" is odd.

Clive said "'The street' is an expression commonly used to mean 'any street'" at #579176. But this is tough to me. I feel "the street" can't mean "any street" becasue "the" means "specific."

Would you explain the meaning or feeling of "the street" in #8?
Or would you explain the meaning of "'The street' is an expression commonly used to mean 'any street'" at #579176? I think "any stree" is a little bit too short to explain the meaning or "the street" in #8. Would you give me some more words?

Complement
The Pocket Oxford Dictionary says "the" has six meanings. But I think none of them is "any" and all of them are "specific."

So I think "street" in #8 is a specific street in a sense. I'd like to know how specific it is.

But please ignore the sentences above if they are incorrect.
northwindIn #8 and #12, the speaker is not telling about a specific street because he is telling about general rules.
True. But consider that, as I said above, this is an idiom "to cross the street", and, as such, it doesn't make sense to pick it apart word by word. Taken as a whole it means roughly "to do street-crossing". Hence 8 and 12 are saying
8 It's illegal in my country to do street-crossing against the light.
12 You should always look both ways before you do street-crossing.
____
Though you wish not to discuss other idioms of this type, I can't resist an explanation of at least one of them in the light of what I said above with regard to street-crossing.
When I say
If your car breaks down, you'll have to take the bus.
take the bus, as a grouping -- as an idiom -- takes on the meaning of do bus-riding. Hence, the meaning is something like

If your car breaks down, you'll have to do some bus-riding.
... in spite of the use of the within the idiom "take the bus", where the does not specify any particular bus.

CJ
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Hello, CJ and Clive,

'The street' is an expression commonly used to mean 'any street'.

Since you can say 'a street' and 'the street' to mean any street, you'd have to rely on the context to make it clear that you were talking about a specific street.

But consider that, as I said above, this is an idiom "to cross the street", and, as such, it doesn't make sense to pick it apart word by word. Taken as a whole it means roughly "to do street-crossing".

I see. I don't understand why, but I'll remember your explanations exactly as they are.
I think an expression sometimes has a very complex feeling or meaning which is difficult to explain by using a few rules especially in case the questioner is a beginner like me.

I'll also remember the following sentences you gave me as they are.

It's illegal in my country to cross the street against the light.
You should always look both ways before you cross the street.
If your car breaks down, you'll have to take the bus.
to go to the bank

When I have studied more English in the future, I wish I'll be able to have or feel your feelings myself.

I'm most grateful for your kind and warm help.
Thank you.
Hi,

You're welcome.

Clive