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Which is correct?
If they are incorrect, what do you say?

#1 The traffic rules of my country prohibit crossing a street while its light is red.
#2 The traffic rules of my country prohibit crossing a street while the light is red.
#3 The traffic rules of my country prohibit crossing the street while its light is red.
#4 The traffic rules of my country prohibit crossing the street while the light is red.
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Comments  
Hi,
Which is correct?
If they are incorrect, what do you say?

#1 The traffic rules of my country prohibit crossing a street while its light is red.
#2 The traffic rules of my country prohibit crossing a street while the light is red.
#3 The traffic rules of my country prohibit crossing the street while its light is red.
#4 The traffic rules of my country prohibit crossing the street while the light is red.

All are correct grammar. 'The street' and 'the light' are more commonly said.
I'd say 'laws' rather than 'rules'.

Best wishes, Clive
Hi, Clive.

How clear!
Thanks!
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The traffic laws of my country prohibit crossing a street against the light.
"against the light" is an idiom for "when the light is red".
CJ
Wow!
My sentences are evoluting!
Thanks!

What's the differnce in meaning or feeling between #5 and #6?

#5 The traffic laws of my country prohibit crossing a street against the light.
#6 The traffic laws of my country prohibit crossing the street against the light.
northwindMy sentences are evoluting evolving! ... What's the difference ...?
a street sounds a bit more general to my ear than the street. It connotes any street.
On the other hand, if it were a specific street, I would tend to use the street:
A friend of mine was fined $95 dollars for crossing the street against the light.
Here only one specific street would have been crossed, so I'd probably say the. Yet, a streetwould also work! In any of these cases, it just depends whether the speaker was thinking in general or specific terms. Emotion: smile
CJ
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Hi,
Instead of The traffic rules of my country prohibit . . . ,
it is much more natural to say
It's against the law in my country to. . .
or It's illegal in my country to . . .

Clive
Wow!
My sentences evolved again!
Thanks!

#7 It's illegal in my country to cross a street against the light.
#8 It's illegal in my country to cross the street against the light.

I well understand "A friend of mine was fined $95 dollars for crossing the street against the light. Here only one specific street would have been crossed, so I'd probably say the. Yet, a street would also work! " I have no quetion about this.

I think "a street" means "the speaker feels the street to be unspecific" and "the street" means "the speaker feels the street to be specific."

But in the situation we're talking about, #7 or #8, the speaker is talking about the general rules in my country so I think he can't feel the street to be specific. So I think #8 is incorrect.

How can the speakder feel the street to be specific or why does the speaker feel the street to be specific?
Hi,

#7 It's illegal in my country to cross a street against the light.
#8 It's illegal in my country to cross the street against the light.

I well understand "A friend of mine was fined $95 dollars for crossing the street against the light. Here only one specific street would have been crossed, so I'd probably say the. Yet, a street would also work! " I have no quetion about this.

I think "a street" means "the speaker feels the street to be unspecific" and "the street" means "the speaker feels the street to be specific." Not really. 'The street' is an expression commonly used to mean 'any street'.

But in the situation we're talking about, #7 or #8, the speaker is talking about the general rules in my country so I think he can't feel the street to be specific. So I think #8 is incorrect. No, it's not.See above.

How can the speakder feel the street to be specific or why does the speaker feel the street to be specific?

Since you can say 'a street' and 'the street' to mean any street, you'd have to rely on the context to make it clear that you were talking about a specific street. You might also use another determiner,
eg You know where the Royal Bank is? I'll meet you outside the bank, in the street.
wg You know the street where the bank is? I live on that street.

Best wishes, Clive
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