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The new transfer student seemed to fit into/in the class very well.

For a start, is "The new transfer student" very idiomatic?" Are there other alternate terms for it?

Second, do both "into" and "in" work with the above sample? If yes, are there marginal differences between them? Thanks.
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Hi,

I wouldn't say it's idiomatic because each word (the new transfer student) functions according to its traditional meaning and syntax. On the other hand, the expression "transfer student" probably didn't exist a hundred years ago because the phenomenon was not common. "Transfer" was probably a verb long before it became an adjective or a noun. Off hand, I can't think of an alternative which is not clumsy by comparison.

In my opinion both "into" and "in" work well. "Into" seems to stress the action, the moving in process, like placing a piece into a puzzle, or making adjustments. With "in," the action has been consumated and is working out well.

You might think about "fit" as a transitive verb and as an intransitive verb. Although it's not transitive here, you might say the student is being fit "into" the class. Then he simply fits "in".

Regards, - A.
AvangiHi,

I wouldn't say it's idiomatic because each word (the new transfer student) functions according to its traditional meaning and syntax. On the other hand, the expression "transfer student" probably didn't exist a hundred years ago because the phenomenon was not common. "Transfer" was probably a verb long before it became an adjective or a noun. Off hand, I can't think of an alternative which is not clumsy by comparison.

In my opinion both "into" and "in" work well. "Into" seems to stress the action, the moving in process, like placing a piece into a puzzle, or making adjustments. With "in," the action has been consumated and is working out well.

Regards, - A.

Thanks, Avangi.
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Well, it goes on!

I checked my dictionary and it doesn't list "transfer" as an adjective, in which case you may be right in calling it an idiom. It does, however, give a noun meaning as "a person who has been transferred, such as a student." It doesn't list "transfer student" as an idiom, and my dictionary of idioms has been loaned out. Sorry.

A.
AvangiWell, it goes on!

I checked my dictionary and it doesn't list "transfer" as an adjective, in which case you may be right in calling it an idiom. It does, however, give a noun meaning as "a person who has been transferred, such as a student." It doesn't list "transfer student" as an idiom, and my dictionary of idioms has been loaned out. Sorry.

A.

Thanks, Avangi.

To make sure, what do you mean by the bolded part?

P.S. Are you a native speaker? If not, how come you write like a native speaker?
Hi, again! "Loaned out" may be another one of those idioms! "Loan" is a verb and a noun often associated with borrowing money. He who gives the money "loans it" or "loans it out." I guess the second version is informal. You can loan your car to a friend (and hope he returns it.) They used to call public libraries "lending libraries" because they loaned out the books. I had a special dictionary which contained only idioms, and I let someone borrow it.

I confess to being a native speaker. I had a stroke and am looking for some free cognitive therapy. I hope I'm not cheating.

Your persistence is appreciated and admired.

A.

P.S. Did you mean to inquire about OFF HAND earlier in the thread? I think it means to offer an opinion without being prepared. "Off the top of my head" is another version.
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AvangiHi, again! "Loaned out" may be another one of those idioms! "Loan" is a verb and a noun often associated with borrowing money. He who gives the money "loans it" or "loans it out." I guess the second version is informal. You can loan your car to a friend (and hope he returns it.) They used to call public libraries "lending libraries" because they loaned out the books. I had a special dictionary which contained only idioms, and I let someone borrow it.

I confess to being a native speaker. I had a stroke and am looking for some free cognitive therapy. I hope I'm not cheating.

Your persistence is appreciated and admired.

A.

P.S. Did you mean to inquire about OFF HAND earlier in the thread? I think it means to offer an opinion without being prepared. "Off the top of my head" is another version.

Thanks, Avangi, for the kind words and encourgaement.

You're very kind!

By the way, would you describe more about "cognitive therapy?" I have only a vague and slight idea of it.
Hi,

"Therapy" is some kind of process you engage in to make you well. You can do it yourself or it can be done to you. Hopefully it would be a cooperative or collaborative effort. The adjective is "theraputic" and a practioner who does it to you is called a "therapist." Sigmund Freud was a famous therapist who treated psychological disorders. A friend of mine is a hand therapist, who helps people rehabilitate their hands after suffering trauma (injury.) People often need "speech therapy" after a stroke. In my case it was my CPU that didn't seem to be working well - especially during attempts at multitasking. "Cognitive" is an adjective for things related to the thinking process. "Cogitate" is an old-fashioned humerous synonym for "think." Then we have the philosopher's Latin phrase, "cogito ergo sum" - "I think, therefore I am."

Hang in there, amigo, - A.
Hey there - transfer student is okay.

Also "fit in" is a phrasal verb - if you fit in, you belong.

The new transfer student seems to be fitting in with her new class quite well. (Or whatever you had - but make fit in to seperate words.) That's my advice.

Avagni, I'm glad you're coming here for your therapy Emotion: smile
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