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The UN humanitarian appeal funded by governments is still underfunded by 26%, and there are fears that initial promises might not be kept.

The UN humanitarian appeal funded by governments is still underfunded by 26%, and there are fears that initial promises might not keep.

I think both of the above are fine. What is the difference between the two? I guess 'might not be kept' is stand for a passive construction. I am not sure. Please tell me.
Comments  
Hi andrei

The second sentence with 'promises might not keep' is not correct.

Milk might not keep if it is left out of the fridge, but promises must be kept!
Nona
Here is the entire passage. So the learned English journalists has made an error.
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Western nations need to deliver the money pledged in the aftermath of the tsunami and stop "dragging their feet", Oxfam has warned in a report.

The UN humanitarian appeal funded by governments is still underfunded by 26%, and there are fears that initial promises might not be kept.

The charity is urging governments to deliver money quickly.

In past emergencies, such as the quake that destroyed the city of Bam in Iran, money was promised but not delivered.

'Dragging feet'

Oxfam praised the response of governments in the aftermath of the tsunami as "admirable".

But it warned that rich country governments were "dragging their feet" on trade and debt reforms to help relieve poverty in the long term.

The charity says some rich countries have temporarily suspended debt repayment rather than cancelling it.

"Countries affected by the tsunami are going to have to pay all that money eventually, starting in 12 months," spokesman Max Lawson told BBC Radio 4's Today programme.

"What we want to see at Oxfam is a bolder step here - some cancellation for the poorest countries affected.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
This article is correct as it uses the 'promises might not be kept' form.

It was the 'promises might not keep' sentence that was incorrect in your first post. Sorry if I confused you there...
Hello Andrei

As Nona says, 'might not be kept' is correct, and that seems to be the phrase the news item uses.

Your comment on the 'learned English journalists' reminded me of this little jingle:

'You cannot hope to bribe or twist
(Thank God) the British journalist;
But seeing what the man will do
Unbribed, there's no occasion to.'

MrP
Here's an example, Mr P. Do you find Andrei's initial title, "The Two Sentences" perfectly fine/okay/a bit strange?
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Hello JTT

I find it suspenseful.

'The Two Sentences' – a story by Conan Doyle.

'Two Sentences' – a chapter by Thomas Hardy.

'The Twa Sentences' – Border ballad (with a down, down a down down).

'The Two Sentences, and how Mr Pedantic answered them; with Mr Micawber's peroration on roast pig' – from Dickens' table of contents.

'Are There Two Sentences?' – the Barsetshire novel no one bothers to read (too long).

'Sentence One, Sentence Two' - pc-ified Agatha Christie. (You don't want to know what the original title was.)

MrP