A person from the Ukraine has told a friend of mine that the country no longer takes the article "the" because they are no longer part of the USSR. Does this make any sense? The Philippines and the Netherlands gets the article and it is not insulting in anyway. Is the article part of those country names owing to some past colony issues? Is this concept with the Ukraine a misunderstanding of English? What right do foreigners have to tell us how to speak?
Do you think it has something to do with the USSR having an article as well?
She lives in Ukraine.
She lives in the Ukraine.
What do style manuals out there do? What does the New York Times do? Matt
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A person from the Ukraine has told a friend of mine that the country no longer takes the article "the" ... Ukraine. She lives in the Ukraine. What do style manuals out there do? What does the New York Times do?

Would you mind checking the Google Groups archives on this? It comes up about every two years, so I know you'll find quite a lot.

Best Donna Richoux
A person from the Ukraine has told a friend of mine that the country no longer takes the article "the" because they are no longer part of the USSR. Does this make any sense?

None.
The Philippines and the Netherlands gets the article and it is not insulting in anyway.

nb. They're plural.
Is the article part of those country names owing to some past colony issues?

No.
Is this concept with the Ukraine a misunderstanding of English?

Yes.
What right do foreigners have to tell us how to speak?

Some.
Do you think it has something to do with the USSR having an article as well?

No.
She lives in Ukraine. She lives in the Ukraine.

Whichever.
What do style manuals out there do? What does the New York Times do?

Dunno.
If I were an inhabitant of The Ukraine I'd think it was kinda groovy that I lived in one of the The countries. Makes ya kinda special.

Adrian
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> I live in The U.S.A. ...or is that in U.S.A.?
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@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com:
A person from the Ukraine has told a friend of mine that the country no longer takes the article "the" ... She lives in the Ukraine. What do style manuals out there do? What does the New York Times do? Matt

It's apparently just a national identity thing. And only applies to non Ukrainian/Russian speakers since neither of those languages has 'a' or 'the' in them. For example, in English, it was 'The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics', but in Russian it was 'Soyuz Sovetskikh Sotsialistichiskikh Respublik' or abbreviated in Cyrillic letters CCCP. (SSSR) There is no 'the'. And Ukraine is simply 'Ukraijna' (border territory) without any 'the' either.
As far as I can recall, no other member of 'the' Union was ever referred to in Other languages as 'the' and I suppose that since they are now an independant nation once more, they prefer for outsiders to drop the 'the'.
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It is "The Gambia", though.
@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com:

A person from the Ukraine has told a friend of ... there do? What does the New York Times do? Matt

It's apparently just a national identity thing. And only applies to non Ukrainian/Russian speakers since neither of those languages has ... I suppose that since they are now an independant nation once more, they prefer for outsiders to drop the 'the'.

The view of the Ukrainians as expressed through their US Embassy is at http://www.ukraineinfo.us/about/aboutukr.html
I've heard the view advanced that the Soviet Union was happy to have the are referred to in English as "The Ukraine" to emphasise it's status as an are of said Union while Ukrainian nationalists were unhappy at the usage. Dunno what other languages did.other than my Oxford Hachette says "l'Ukraine" while my Spanish and German dictionaries omit the article.
John Dean
Oxford
(snip)
I've heard the view advanced that the Soviet Union was happy to have the are referred to in English as ... Dunno what other languages did.other than my Oxford Hachette says "l'Ukraine" while my Spanish and German dictionaries omit the article.

I think that I can probably agree with that, although, as far as I can tell, no other republic was ever prefixed with 'the' by English Speakers, and they were all considered (unofficially), subordinate. Byelorus, Tadzhikistan, Azbekistan, Estonia, Lithuania, Turkmen, Armenia, Gruzia(Georgia) and I forget the rest.

David Wright
http://home.alltel.net/dwrighsr/index.html
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