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Dear teachers,

I still can't master the usage of "also"

I happened to read the following three sentences with answers from a forum a few days ago by chance. According to what they said: "The meaning of a sentence can be different when the word "also" is written at different position." Though I have a book of Swan Practical English Usage with me (Printed on year 1997, Second edition 1995), non of the explanations from the book under the entries of (also) and ( also, as well as, too) looks similar to what the three sentences and answers described.

I doubt the structure of the sentences and meanings are all correct. Especially sentence 3. I thought "also" cannot be placed at the end of a sentence. Could you kindly explain them in detail? And I want to know the difference between "is also" and "also is".

Here are the three sentences with answers I copied from that forum:
1. William is also concerned in this matter.
= William is concerned in this matter as well as that one.

2. William also is concerned in this matter.
=William is concerned in this matter,just as somebody else is.

3. William is concerned in this matter also.
=This matter is the last of many that have been mentioned.

Your explanation will be very much appreciated!
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Nokia88
1. William is also concerned in this matter.
2. William also is concerned in this matter.
3. William is concerned in this matter also.
Hi cell phone!Emotion: smile
Here's my take.
1. The most common position for also. English can be ambiguous and inexact with regard to what also refers to but in most cases I would understand the sentence to mean "William, too, is concerned in this matter". There are other people that are concerned in the matter.
2. This is a more emphatic position for also but the meaning remains the same.
3. The sentence is ambiguous. It can mean the same as sentences 1 and 2 but alsomay also Emotion: smile refer tothis matter. In other words, William is concerned in other matters as well.
Other members may see things differently. In English things are sometimes seen differently...
CB
Comments  
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Cool BreezeOther members may see things differently
I read the first one this way: "In addition to what has been already said, William is also concerned in this matter." In other words, William is concerned in A, B, C, and also in D. 
Cool Breeze
Nokia88
1. William is also concerned in this matter.
2. William also is concerned in this matter.
3. William is concerned in this matter also.

Hi cell phone!

Here's my take.

1. The most common position for also. English can be ambiguous and inexact with regard to what also refers to but in most cases I would understand the sentence to mean "William, too, is concerned in this matter". There are other people that are concerned in the matter.

2. This is a more emphatic position for also but the meaning remains the same.

3. The sentence is ambiguous. It can mean the same as sentences 1 and 2 but also may also refer to this matter. In other words, William is concerned in other matters as well.

Other members may see things differently. In English things are sometimes seen differently...

CB

Nokia is also made in Finland.
Nokia also is made in Finland.
Nokia is made in Finland also.
Nokia88 cell phone is indebted to Finland also...LoL Maybe I should make a call to Finland to find out the exact answer.

Big Thanks to Cool Breeze -(Finland)-