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Hello,

I am not sure whether these sentence make sense in term of grammar and semantics.
Can you give me a hand with checking them
Thank you for your help.


1.Every single day a boss with the high emotion quotient has a myriad of opportunities to improve efficiency such as making the workplace a more upbeat place to work, complimenting his employees, and boosting their morale.

2.He was elated at/by getting the permission to .

3.As a result of developing responsibility, children should do chores as young as possible
Comments  
1.Every single day a boss with a high emotion quotient has myriad opportunities to improve efficiency, such as making the workplace a more upbeat place, complimenting his employees, and boosting their morale.

2.He was elated at gaining admission to Harvard University.

3. In order to develop responsibility, children should begin doing chores at as young an age as possible.
Comment: "A myriad of" sounds OK.
Although you can use "myriad" by itself, it sounds more English if you say "countless" instead.
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Interesting. I'd have opted for a third form: 'a myriad opportunities'.

MrP
Probably right. It's difficult to say with such an uncommon word. :-)
Per my dictionary-- 'myriad' as noun: 'a myriad of problems'; 'myriad' as adjective: 'myriad problems'. I knew it was an odd adjective, but I didn't know it meant '10,000'.
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Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching:

"The way begets one; one begets two; two begets three; three begets the myriad creatures."