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Hi,

I have a sentence from a reference book below and am wondering if I can delete the first "the" and add "the" on the second spot indicated? Or tell me why have "the" on the first place and no "the" on the second.

The information in 1. the? Culture Corner is from 2. (the) Time magazine (March 20, 1990).

I think you can grasp where my grammar weak point lies and possibly refer me to a previous post or two or help me in detail if that's possible here.
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Hi,

I have a sentence from a reference book below and am wondering if I can delete the first "the" and add "the" on the second spot indicated? Or tell me why have "the" on the first place and no "the" on the second.

The information in 1. the? Culture Corner is from 2. (the) Time magazine (March 20, 1990).

I don't understand why this sentence has the numbers 1. and 2. as part of its syntax.

The magaazine's proper name is Time, so it needs no 'the'.

What is 'Culture Corner'. Is it a proper name? Does the proper name contain the word 'the'?

Best wishes, Clive
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Thank you.

The original sentence goes like this:

The information in the Culture Corner is from Time magazine.

Now, The questions that I have are two-fold.

1) Why "the" before Culture Corner when the name (?) is captalized and it seems to be safe to assume it is a proper name. (Anyway, when some words that seem to represent a name are capitalized, can we definitely assume that as a proper name?)

2) Why no "the" before a proper name "Time" when that proper name is being followed with "magazine", which is not capitalized, so it seems that it is not a part of the proper name.

As here,

the Jeffery's Best clothing store - you can put "the" here because clothing store is not part of a proper store name, which I gather from non-capitalization of initial letters "c" and "s. Right?
Hi,

The information in the Culture Corner is from Time magazine.

Now, The questions that I have are two-fold.

1) Why "the" before Culture Corner when the name (?) is captalized and it seems to be safe to assume it is a proper name. Then 'the' should not be used here. (Anyway, when some words that seem to represent a name are capitalized, can we definitely assume that as a proper name?) We can assume that. But I wouldn't say 'definitely' because Some People Are not caReful With Capital Letters.

2) Why no "the" before a proper name "Time" when that proper name is being followed with "magazine", which is not capitalized, so it seems that it is not a part of the proper name. I think the proper name of the magazine is actually 'Time Magazine'. If not, we commonly think of that as the name. People say 'I read a story in Time Magazine'.

As here,

the Jeffery's Best clothing store - you can put "the" here because clothing store is not part of a proper store name, which I gather from non-capitalization of initial letters "c" and "s. Right? Right.

Best wishes again, Clive
Thank you very much for your detailed explanation.

Now, I know that some proper names are allowed to accompany "thes"because of specificity or other valid reasons. Now I also know that "some" include govenment agency names like the below but are there any other cases you know of that can accompany "thes"? In addition, maybe go over the other valid reasons for me if you will (of course, based on the assumption, there are others.).

Ex.

The Ministry of Health and Wefare said... (The proper should be Ministry of Health and Welfare, I am sure.)

Monday's annuouncement by the Internal Affairs Ministry that it would join the Board of Audit and Inspection in looking at... (Both proper names, as far as I can see, are Internal Affairs Ministry and Board of Audit and Inspection, but "thes" were inclued for the reasons suggested in the beginning of my post.)

An official at the Disease Policy Division of the ministry told the.. (OK, another case of a government agency being told or specified eventhough it is a division of a minstry? So "the" allowed?)
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Hi again,

Now, I know that some proper names are allowed to accompany "thes"because of specificity or other valid reasons. Now I also know that "some" include govenment agency names like the below but are there any other cases you know of that can accompany "thes"? Possibly, but it's hard to think of any. You need to be a little bit flexible about this topic. My advice is that you should not expect all names to be written with 100% consistencey to a set of 'rules'. In addition, maybe go over the other valid reasons for me if you will (of course, based on the assumption, there are others.).

Ex.

The Ministry of Health and Wefare said... (The proper should be Ministry of Health and Welfare, I am sure.)

Monday's annuouncement by the Internal Affairs Ministry that it would join the Board of Audit and Inspection in looking at... (Both proper names, as far as I can see, are Internal Affairs Ministry and Board of Audit and Inspection, but "thes" were inclued for the reasons suggested in the beginning of my post.)

An official at the Disease Policy Division of the ministry told the.. (OK, another case of a government agency being told or specified eventhough it is a division of a minstry? So "the" allowed?)

I agree with your examples.

Best wishes again, Clive