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In a dialog of a hotel booking like the following:

Receptionist: Can you give me the dates, please?

Secreatary: The 21st of September to the 2nd of October, inclusive.

If the guest leave the hotel in the afternoon on 2nd of October, I think, there are all together 12days or 11 nights.

Question 1, Does Americans use this word in daily life when book a hotel?

Question 2, Why use this word. I think everybody know there are 11 nights for the guest.

Best wishes,

Thanks a lot!

Comments  
No, they are booking to stay at the hotel each of those nights. If they just said to the 2nd of October then you might think they are leaving on the 2nd of October. By saying 'inclusive' it is made clear that the 2nd is included in the nights they wish to stay and book the room for, and they will actually leave the hotel on the 3rd.

So they are staying 12 nights.
exactly
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Nona The Brit
No, they are booking to stay at the hotel each of those nights. If they just said to the 2nd of October then you might think they are leaving on the 2nd of October. By saying 'inclusive' it is made clear that the 2nd is included in the nights they wish to stay and book the room for, and they will actually leave the hotel on the 3rd.

So they are staying 12 nights.

Thanks for your explanation. Please look at the following passage

Dear Sirs,

I would like to book a single room with bath form the 21st of September to the 2nd of October, inclusive. It's for Allan Mancone, our sales manager. As you know, our executives usually stay at your hotel when in London. We would like you to provide a room with a telephone extension and overlooking the park, if possible. Mr. Mancone will arrive on the morning of the 21st of September, and leave in the afternoon on the 2nd October. Could you please confirm this booking with a return letter? We look forward to hearing form you.

Yours faithfully.

According to your explanation, the second sentence in blue should be like this: on the morning of the 21st of September, and leave in the afternoon on the 3rd October.

Above is the copy from a textbook, Oh, my God, This textbook has been taught and printed for several years and still has this mistake in it. Today, I have the doubt about it, but I am not sure. So come here for help.

Thanks again.
I realize that I'm not responding to your question, but I'd just like to point out some errors I noticed. I believe the first sentence should read "room with a bath" (I don't think this is an error, but it sounds a bit more aesthetic to me) and in the first and last sentences "form" should be "from."
Thethenothere123I realize that I'm not responding to your question, but I'd just like to point out some errors I noticed. I believe the first sentence should read "room with a bath" (I don't think this is an error, but it sounds a bit more aesthetic to me) and in the first and last sentences "form" should be "from."
Oh, that should be "from"

It's not the fault of the passage, it's my typing mistake.

Thanks.
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Unfortunately it seems that there is an error in the textbook. If you tell a hotel you wish to stay for .....to the 2nd October inclusive, then the 2nd is a night you are booking the room for.
Nona The BritUnfortunately it seems that there is an error in the textbook. If you tell a hotel you wish to stay for .....to the 2nd October inclusive, then the 2nd is a night you are booking the room for.
Thanks for your confirmation. I like this forum.