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Hi

Question 1

Sentence A: Is it another case of attempting the theft of my visa card identity?

Sentense B: Is it another case of attempting to steal my visa card identity?

Which sentence is correct? and why?

Question 2

The legal activities defined in Canada does not necessary the legal activities in another country.

Is the above question correct? Can I replace the "does" by the "is"?

Thanks
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Question 1:

B sounds correct, but what do the sentences mean? Emotion: tongue tied

Question 2:

The sentence is definitely wrong: 1st, the subject of "does" is "activities" - a plural, so you should change it to "do". 2nd, if you use "do" as an auxiliary, there must be a main verb, like "apply to". You can't replace "does" by "is", because you want a plural there; so it should be "are".
Comments  
Question 1

Sentence A: Is it another case of attempting the theft of my visa card identity?

Sentence B: Is it another case of attempting to steal my visa card identity?

Which sentence is correct? and why?

This is a tough question and this is a basic forum

Sentence B is better, but not perfect.

Sentence B: Is it another case of [someone] attempting to steal my visa card identity?

Sentence A, though it looks fine, is not very good.

You can try to look at it in several different ways:

1. Is it [another case of attempting] the theft of my visa card identity?

another case of attempting = a new attempt

1s. Is it a new attempt the theft of my visa card identity? BAD

2. Is it another case of [attempting the theft of my visa card identity]?

attempting the theft of my visa card identity = someone attempting the theft of my visa card identity

2s1. Is it another case of [someone attempting the theft of my visa card identity]? WHY this crazy structure of this long object after case of...

2s2. Is it another case of the attempt of the theft of my visa card identity? GOOD but has a different structure

2s2. Is it another case of attempted theft of my visa card identity? GOOD but has a different structure

attempt is a noun

to attempt (to) is a verb

case of requires a noun

theft is a crucial noun

Sentence A is actually:

Is it another case of the theft of my visa card identity?

When you want to extend this structure you can't easily replace in this case the theft with

[someone attempting the theft]

If you use attempting to it is clear that you want to say that all what is after case of... is an object of case of...

[case of attempting theft] can be easily confused with [case of attempted theft] as well

Out of 856 usages of "case of attempting" - 747 are used in form "case of attempting to"

Out of 88.100 usages of "case of trying" - 65.700 are used in form "case of trying to"

Similar:

"case of attempting to commit suicide" 2 usages (it is too long)

"case of attempting suicide" 2 usages only

"case of attempted suicide" 354 usages

"case of attempting to rob" 1 usage

"case of attempting a robbery" 0 usages

"case of attempted robbery" 44 usages

I wouldn't say that A or B are totally grammatically wrong, but there was no reason to use more difficult constructions when you have simple one.

Actually

Sentence C: Is it another case of the attempted theft of my visa card identity? BEST

Sentence B: Is it another case of attempting to steal my visa card identity? NOT SO GOOD

Sentence A: Is it another case of attempting the theft of my visa card identity? EVEN WORSE

Just to repeat that grammatically both sentences are not incorrect, yet very difficult to read. For example "case of making/doing/... [something]" are perfect constructions, "case of looking at" as well, even very funny ones like "case of wanting to"... all acceptable, but in your case there was no reason to use them. If there is a grammatical error under "Unnecessary extension" then there your sentences are. (Sentence B is better but not perfect either.)

Question 2

The legal activities defined in Canada does not necessary the legal activities in another country.

necessary is not a verb

do necessary, on its own, as far as I know, means nothing

Is the above question correct?

NO

The legal activities defined in Canada do not [what???] the legal activities in another country.

[what???] = conform, require, correspond...

or

The legal activities defined in Canada are not necessary the legal activities in another country.

but is it really what you wanted to say?