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Hi

Could you please tell me if the use of devoted is correct and natural in these sentences? If is it INCORRECT, could you please provide me with a suitable word?

1) The teacher's speech was mainly devoted to political issues.

2) The meeting was largely devoted to the recent staff turn-over.

3) There are six drivers in the company--but two are fully devoted?? to the CEO. (I don't mean sincere here. I mean at his disposal. Any substitue?)

4) One room in his small apartment is fully devoted? to a library.

I hope I am able to get the message across.

Thanks for your time and effort,

Tom
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Hi,

OK except as noted.

Could you please tell me if the use of devoted is correct and natural in these sentences? If is it INCORRECT, could you please provide me with a suitable word?

1) The teacher's speech was mainly devoted to political issues.

2) The meeting was largely devoted to the recent staff turn-over.

3) There are six drivers in the company--but two are fully devoted?? to the CEO. (I don't mean sincere here. I mean at his disposal. Any substitue?) In theory ambiguous, but not likely to be misunderstood. You could say, eg but two are exclusively for use by the CEO.

4) One room in his small apartment is fully devoted? to use as a library.

Clive
Many thanks, Clive. One more question--how do you find the following structure?

One room in his small apartment is fully devoted as a library.

Tom
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Hi,

Not good.

'Devote' is usually followed by 'to'.

eg His time is devoted to teaching English.

eg He devotes his time to teaching English.

Clive
I'm so grateful, Clive--and I understand the point. But what confuses me is why I should use "use" in the original sentence instead of "using". You have used a gerund in both sentences. Please see:

One room in his apartment is devoted to use a library.

His time is devoted to teaching English.

Could you please shed some light on this?

Tom
Hi,

But what confuses me is why I should use "use" in the original sentence instead of "using". You have used a gerund in both sentences. Please see:

One room in his apartment is devoted to use a library.

His time is devoted to teaching English.

Could you please shed some light on this?

You need to say 'devoted to something', (a noun, a pronoun, a gerund).

His time is devoted to teaching English. This gerund is OK.

One room in his apartment is devoted to use a library. The grammar indicates 'use' is a verb infinitive, so it's not OK.

One room in his apartment is devoted to ( use as a library ). 'Use' is now a noun. This is OK.

One room in his apartment is devoted to ( using as a library ). Awkward, because there is a noun form of the verb 'use'.

There is no noun form (apart from the gerund) of the verb 'teach', or of most other verbs.

Please post again if this is still not clear.

Best wishes, Clive
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Oh, I'm so thankful to you, Clive.

Could you please tell me if devoted would here too? If not, then what word would you suggest?

1) The Manager suggested that one guard should constantly be _________________outside the lift. There have been too many complaints recently about the lift going out of order and people getting stuck. (DEVOTED?)

2) As the number of the boys increased, the head suggested that one sweeper should permanantly be _______________outside the general washroom. (DEVOTED?)

Thanks,

Tom
For 1, I'd suggest stationed or assigned, and for 2, I'd suggest stationed.
Neat!

Why can't the second sentence take the word "assigned"?, Barbara?

Tom
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