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I will not let my children be treated in that way.

Can we say"I will not let my children treated in that way"?

What about the passive voice"The children is let to stay at home when his parents go to work"? Is it right? Thanks.
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Comments  
1) I will not let my children treated in that way - this is incorrect.

2) I cannot think of a way to express this in the passive voice.

From www.bbc.co.uk

let + object + infinitive

Like make, see and hear, let is followed by object + bare infinitive. It cannot be followed by verb-ing:

  • Let me carry that box of papers for you. It's very heavy.
    Why don't you let him walk home by himself from school now? He's eleven years old after all
Let is also frequently used in the expression let's (let us) to introduce a suggestion. Note that negative sentences with let's can be formed in two possible ways:

  • Let's finish the video tomorrow, shall we? I'm tired and I want to go to bed.
    Let's not be late home tonight. It's Monday tomorrow after all.
    Don't let's get too stressed about this. I know the car is damaged, but it's only a piece of metal.
We do not normally use let in the passive voice.
Nona The Brit

  • Don't let's get too stressed about this. I know the car is damaged, but it's only a piece of metal.


Is it correct??
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In the UK, people use don't let's or let's not in the negative.
QingqingWhat about the passive voice"The children is let to stay at home when his parents go to work"? Is it right? Thanks.

" let " is unusual in passive forms; we prefer " allow "

The children are allowed to stay at home when his parents go to work.

How about either "the child is allowed to stay at home when his parents go to work" or "the children are allowed to stay at home when their parents go to work"? (Unless the parents are the parents of some unknow person, rather than of the child/children allowed to stay at home.)

Also - in the U.S., "let's not" would be much more common than "don't let's."
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It's not a myth. The standard of English is the U.S. is slipping on all levels. California, as reported by a radio talkshow commentary tw o weeks ago, scored the second poorest in SAT, next to the State of Mississippi which has the worst SAT scores in the nation. About half of the high school graduates in that State can not adequately comprehend reading materials nor write a decent essay; not to mention math and science. But in California? The State that produced 25% of the nation's GDP during the technology boom just a few years ago? That's mind-boggling! Having said that, I personally heard a lot of natives say "let's don't be late...." instead of "let's not ....". On top of that, the ghetto-style and gangster English are being glamorized as "hip and going-on". Then, the ICQ style English which I call "lazy English" is being practiced on the daily basis by young adults in chatrooms and text messaging on cell phones more often than they do on real school work. Perhaps, that's the reason American English get's bashed. sigh.....Emotion: embarrassed

Asian
It's not a myth. The standard of English is the U.S. is slipping on all levels. California, as reported by a radio talkshow commentary tw o weeks ago, scored the second poorest in SAT, next to the State of Mississippi which has the worst SAT scores in the nation. About half of the high school graduates in that State can not adequately comprehend reading materials nor write a decent essay; not to mention math and science. But in California? The State that produced 25% of the nation's GDP during the technology boom just a few years ago? That's mind-boggling! Having said that, I personally heard a lot of natives say "let's don't be late...." instead of "let's not ....". On top of that, the ghetto-style and gangster English are being glamorized as "hip and going-on". Then, the ICQ style English which I call "lazy English" is being practiced on the daily basis by young adults in chatrooms and text messaging on cell phones more often than they do on real school work. Perhaps, that's the reason American English get's bashed. sigh.....Emotion: embarrassed
I think overall, your argument seems to be very well laid out.

Help me to understand how all the points you laid out previously are related to the final point you brought out that said "that's the reason American English gets bashed." Though I feel emphathy for your sighing.
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