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Hello,

Could anyone explain to me the use of underlined 'of' in these sentences?

If the speaker is implying in line 10 that he is not deserving of love, which of the following most strongly supports the implication?

Against that time when thou shalt strangely pass,
And scarcely greet me with that sun, thine eye,
When love, converted from the thing it was,
Shall reasons find of settled gravity—

Thanks
Comments  
He is not deserving of love = He does not deserve love.

'of settled gravity' is an adjective phrase that modifies 'reasons'.
Will the meaning be still the same if we remove the 'of' in both sentences?
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You can remove it in the first instance with no harm to the meaning, but it is not grammatically possible to remove it in the second instance.
He is not deserving of love = He does not deserve love. Is the first sentence as common as the second sentence?
No. It is rather formal, perhaps dated.
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Thanks.