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Hi

Do you find the use of this simile correct and natural?
We were like two railway tracks--went side by side for years but never met at any point.
I think the use of "tracks" is incorrect here. By then...what do we call that part of the railway tracks that can never meet? Something like this:


___________________________________________________________

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Thanks,

Tom
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Mr. TomI think the use of "tracks" is incorrect here.
Technically yes, but the simile loses nothing by that. "rail" is the term for each half. Lines that never meet, in the sense you are referring to, are called "parallel lines". Two parallel steel rails joined by wooden ties form the track.

CJ
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Thank you, CJ

Could you please put it in the whole sentence for me? I'd be grateful.

Tom
Mr. TomCould you please put it in the whole sentence for me? I'd be grateful.
You already have the whole sentence!

We were like two railway tracks--went side by side for years but never met at any point.

As I said, you can use tracks if you want, but if you want rais instead you can say

We were like two rails of a track. We went side by side for years but never met at any point.

CJ
Dear CJ, now you have awakened my curiosity. What is RAIS? I tried googling, but couldn't find it anywhere.

Some technical term?

Thanks,

Tom
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