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The use of the gerund : "being"

Is the following correct or incorrect technically and why? (It does not sound right to me).

A. "The design margin is one metre, assuming the liquid being at boiling point."

compared to

B. "The design margin is one metre, assuming the liquid is at boiling point."

Is the following correct or incorrect technically and why.

be: verb and auxiliary verb,

is: present singular 3rd person

being: present participle

Thanks

Douglas Murray
1 2
Comments  
"The design margin is one metre, assuming the liquid being at boiling point."

No go

B

"The design margin is one metre, assuming (that) the liquid is at boiling point."

fine

assuming (that) is the sub conjunction in B.
Inchoateknowledge"The design margin is one metre, assuming the liquid being at boiling point."

No go

B

"The design margin is one metre, assuming (that) the liquid is at boiling point."

fine

assuming (that) is the sub conjunction in B.

I agree that is does not sound right. But I still am not clear why. What is a sub conjunction (in B).

Dropping "assuming" in the first (A) gives the following:

C. "The design margin is one metre, the liquid being at boiling point."

This does sound correct. So, why, technically, is C correct and A not correct?

Thanks

Doug
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Very interesting. Join Doug.

By the way, a search for "assuming it being" in google gave 192 (I know, too few) results. Are they all bad sounding or incorrect?
Hi DouglasM6

If you include assuming, the word (a present participle) begins a clause equivalent:
'The design margin is one metre, assuming the liquid is at boiling point.'
= 'The design margin is one metre if we assume (that) the liquid is at boiling point.'

It is not possible to have yet another clause equivalent in the ensuing that-clause by using being (another present participle) instead of the finite verb is. It just violates the established usage and grammar of English.

However, if we drop assuming, the problem disappears as we now have only one participle, only one clause equivalent:
'The design margin is one metre, the liquid being at boiling point.'
= 'The design margin is one metre if/when the liquid is at boiling point.'

Cheers
CB
Ant_222By the way, a search for "assuming it being" in google gave 192 (I know, too few) results. Are they all bad sounding or incorrect?
Yes, as mentioned in the above, two "-ing forms" in series doesn't make for nice English.
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Cool BreezeHi DouglasM6

If you include assuming, the word (a present participle) begins a clause equivalent:
'The design margin is one metre, assuming the liquid is at boiling point.'
= 'The design margin is one metre if we assume (that) the liquid is at boiling point.'

It is not possible to have yet another clause equivalent in the ensuing that-clause by using being (another present participle) instead of the finite verb is. It just violates the established usage and grammar of English.

However, if we drop assuming, the problem disappears as we now have only one participle, only one clause equivalent:
'The design margin is one metre, the liquid being at boiling point.'
= 'The design margin is one metre if/when the liquid is at boiling point.'

Cheers
CB
So, is it true that we have a rule here: only one present participle per clause equivalent ???

Thanks for all your input.

Doug
What is the difference between a "clause equivalent" and a clause?

Thanks,

Doug
InchoateknowledgeB

"The design margin is one metre, assuming (that) the liquid is at boiling point."

fine

assuming (that) is the sub conjunction in B.

Please define a "sub conjunction".

Thanks, Doug
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