+0
On his deathbed, Raphael bequeathed his mistress enough money to live "honorably" for the rest of her life.

In this sentence, the logical subject of the to-infinitive "to live 'honorably' for the rest of her life" is Raphael or mistress? Because of the word "her", the logical subject should be "mistress", but can a object serve as a logical subject of the adverbials in the same sentence? I mean that does the logical subject of the adverbial and the subject of the main clause must be the same one?

Thank you very much!
+0
Hello Copy,

I would interpret the sentence as follows:

1. On his deathbed, Raphael bequeathed his mistress enough money [for her] to live honorably for the rest of her life.

Thus the underlined parts qualify "money".

Best wishes,

MrP
+0
copysnakeOn his deathbed, Raphael bequeathed his mistress enough money to live "honorably" for the rest of her life.
I'm curious, c.s., was that the bequethal, or is that a third party's estimate of it? Emotion: thinking - A.