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'Obama to order Guantanamo close' in this sentence, I don't really know what it means to use 'to' here.
It is not used in the same sense as how we normally use 'to' in sentences such as " i will have to wait 10 mins for my eggs to cook."
It's really hard to catch nuances in English. I mean, for example, why didn't the writer write it like this ' Obama orders Guam~ to close' ? Why did the writer choose to use that grammatical structure?
I am thinking there must be a difference in meaning such as to emphasize etc.

Please help.
thanks,
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Hi,
'Obama to order Guantanamo close' in this sentence, This is not a complete sentence. It's like a newspaper heading or story title. Such things are often abbreviated. The full sentence would be 'Obama is to order the close of Guantanamo'.
'Obama is to' means 'He is about to'. In other words, he hasn't done it yet, but he will do it soon.

I don't really know what it means to use 'to' here.
It is not used in the same sense as how we normally use 'to' in sentences such as " i will have to wait 10 mins for my eggs to cook."
It's really hard to catch nuances in English. I mean, for example, why didn't the writer write it like this ' Obama orders Guam~ to close' ? Why did the writer choose to use that grammatical structure?
I am thinking there must be a difference in meaning such as to emphasize etc.

Best wishes, Clive
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lereve I don't really know what it means to use 'to' here
If you think of "to" as "is going to", you'll have the essence of it.

Headlines have peculiarities of their own. The idea is to say as much as you can in the fewest number of words.

CJ
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