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I wanna thank you, the experts at EnglishForward,

in advance for your replies and instructions.

According to my knowledge, such parlances as

"It's adj. (for/to the interseted person) for sb to do..." and

"It's a/an n. (for/to the interseted person) for sb to do..." are valid.

So, are such sentences as

"It's dangerous/a danger your doing ..." &

"It's dangerous/a danger for you doing ..." valid?

Looking forward to your answer(s) with gratitude.

P.S.:

For fans of English Language as foreign language, the efforts of you to instruct us

(OR 'the efforts of you instructing us'----

Is it kinda another querstion?), do be what heroes do.

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Hi,

According to my knowledge, such parlances as

"It's adj. (for/to the interseted interested/involved person) for sb to do..." &

"It's a/an n. (for/to the interseted interested/involved person) for sb to do..." are valid.

Yes.

eg It's upsetting to Tom for his parents to get divorced.

eg It's a problem for Tom for his parents to get divorced.

So, are such sentences as

"It's dangerous/a danger your doing ..." &

"It's dangerous/a danger for you doing ..." valid?

( These are not the same structure as the first set. )

It's dangerous your crossing this busy highway. Sounds awkward. Say

eg Your crossing this busy highway is dangerous.

eg Crossing this busy highway is dangerous for/to you.

My comments on these are similar to my last ones. Say it the way I just mentioned.

If you must say it the following way, it sounds like informal speech. And put a comma as shown.

It's a danger, your crossing this busy highway.

It's a danger for you, crossing this busy highway.

Clive
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Hi,

According to my knowledge, such parlances as

"It's adj. (for/to the interested/involved person) for sb to do..." &

"It's a/an n. (for/to the interested/involved person) for sb to do..." are valid.

Yes.

eg It's upsetting to Tom for his parents to get divorced.

eg It's a problem for Tom for his parents to get divorced.

So, are such sentences as

"It's dangerous/a danger your doing ..." &

"It's dangerous/a danger for you doing ..." valid?

( These are not the same structure as the first set. )

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I appreciate your instructions, Clive. I think I got what you meant. It's about the difference

between 'to do' and 'doing', that is another issue.

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It's dangerous your crossing this busy highway. Sounds awkward. Say

eg Your crossing this busy highway is dangerous.

eg Crossing this busy highway is dangerous for/to you.

My comments on these are similar to my last ones. Say it the way I just mentioned.

If you must say it the following way, it sounds like informal speech. And put a comma as shown.

It's a danger, your crossing this busy highway.

It's a danger for you, crossing this busy highway.

Clive

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Thank you sincerely for your reply and kindness, once again.

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Seven ? Again ?

It's the 'Seven sufferings' that compose the life.

Birth, Aging, Illness, Death, the reunion of haters, the parting of lovers, and try in vain.

Birth, Aging, Illness, Death, the reunion of haters, the parting of lovers, and try in vain.

That's what life is all about. In nature.
Hi,

Birth, Aging, Illness, Death, the reunion of haters, the parting of lovers, and trying in vain.

Birth, Aging, Illness, Death, the reunion of haters, the parting of lovers, and trying in vain.

I'd also remove all but the initial capital.

Clive
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