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I try to classify the verb as below. Please let me know whether it’s correct.

1. Finite

1.1. Main Verb

1.1.1. Transitive >>> Ditransitive

1.1.2. Intransitive >>> Linking

1.2. Helping Verb (24)

1.2.1. Primary Helping Verb (11) >>>
  • Verb to BE: is, am, are, was, were
  • Verb to DO: do, does, did
  • Verb to HAVE: have, has, had
1.2.2. Modal Helping Verb (13) >>>
  • Pure-Modal: will, would, shall, should, can, could, may, might, must
  • Semi-Modal: Ought (to), to used (to), need, dare
2. Non-finite (Verbal)

2.1. Infinitive

2.2. Gerund

2.3. Participle


It confused me with this sentence: She is studying English now.

I understand that “is” is a Helping Verb and “studying” is a Main Verb. But in the form of V-ing, “studying” is Present Participle which is Non-finite Verb. I wonder whether the word “studying” function as Finite Verb or Non-finite Verb?

If anyone could kindly educate me on this matter, I would appreciate.

Trill
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TrillionaireI wonder whether the word “studying” function as Finite Verb or Non-finite Verb?
Non-finite.

If you follow your classification system strictly,

is is under 1.2.1 Primary Helping Verb, and studying is under 2.3 Participle, which is non-finite, and there is no 'main verb', as defined in your chart.

I find the chart itself in need of some revision. It is particularly unclear about what a 'main verb' is, or whether a given verb form can belong to more than one category at a time. (I assume not.)

CJ
Comments  
If a verb is marked with tense (and agreement), we call it finite.

It is not the case that only main verbs can be finite.

As you know, there can be auxiliaries (helping verbs) in front of the main verb, and if there are auxiliaries the tense is marked on the first auxiliary.

So the other verbs including the main verb except for the first auxiliary are non-finite forms when auxiliary(s) is(are) used.

In the sentence, "She is studying English now."

"is" is an auxiliary and tensed(finite)

and "studying" is the main verb in non-finite form.

Other example can be given.

I should have done it.

modal perf main V

(finite) (non-finite) (non-F)

PAST Base(Inf.) Past Participle

Regards.
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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
CWLeeOther example can be given.
I should have done it.
modal perf main V
(finite) (non-finite) (non-F)
PAST Base(Inf.) Past Participle
Thank you for your reply.

as you explained, Main Verb and Helping Verb can be both "finite and non-finite verb", right?

Please correct me if it's not correct.

I have done it.

"have" is Helping verb in a finite verb.

"done" is Main verb in a non-finite verb.

It would also great if you cound give version of verb chart.

Trill
Thank you for your kind reply.

Could you please explain more about Finite Verb? If you cauld also give me a new verb chart.

Trill
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Hi,

Main Verb and Helping Verb can be both "finite and non-finite verb", right?

(That's right. Modal auxiliaries, however, can only be finite.

The examples such as "to can, will can, canning, have canned" are all ungrammatical.)

Please correct me if it's not correct.

I have done it.

"have" is Helping verb in a finite verb.

"done" is Main verb in a non-finite verb.

(Your understanding is correct.)

It would also great if you cound give version of verb chart.

(You're verb chart is good, I think, except for 'Finite/Non-finite' part.

Finiteness should be separated from Main/Helping verb classification.

In addition, if you remember the order of verbal elements, it will be useful.

1) Modal Auxiliary + base(infinitive) form : modality

2) Have + p.p. (past participle) : perfect (aspects)

3) Be + -ing (present participle) : progressive (aspects)

4) Be+ p.p. : passive (voice)

5) Main Verb : lexical meaning

These five verbal elements always come in this order, that is, 1), 2), 3), 4), 5), when they used in a sentence together, and the form or verb is determined by the immediately preceding auxiliary.

Tense (present/past) is only marked once, on the first verbal element.)

I hope this is of help.

Regard.
Regards