Hi,
It has recently come to my attention that the noun phrase "courses lectured in English" is rather common. As a non-native speaker and learner of the language, I don't think it is correct. This is because "lecture" isn't a transitive verb. "Courses (which are) lectured in English" (incorrectly) implies it is a transitive.

However, someone found the following passages where "lecture" is indeed used as a transitive verb.
1. It was asked how much consideration questionnaire results received,and why, if a lecturer scores very badly one year, he/she may continue to lecture the course the following year.
(http://www.maths.ox.ac.uk/~murc/minutes/mins9511.html )
2. Resources are required to lecture the course, to invigilate thepractical and problem sessions, to set and mark coursework, to set and mark exams, to answer student questions, and so on. (http://www.engineering.ucl.ac.uk/committees/pg sub/Documents%20for%20...)
The two sentences are taken from British sources. I want to know whether they are valid evidence for the transitive use of the verb "lecture". Or are the authors non-native speakers? Maybe could you please look at other sentences on the sites to see if there is any sign of non-native English speakers?
I'd appreciate your help.
Ray
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Ray schrieb:
Hi, It has recently come to my attention that the noun phrase "courses lectured in English" is rather common. As ... you please look at other sentences on the sites to see if there is any sign of non-native English speakers?

First of all I'd like to point out that as the links show we are talking here about English as written by natural scientists/engineers - as someone who has on occasion had to translate texts written by natural scientists and engineers I have to admit that regardless of their native language most people who have received studied natural science or technological subjcts have never received any training in writing and thus have difficulty expressing themselves properly in writing.

Secondly, however, English grammar is very flexible and readily absorbs new structures. while it is true that the verb "to lecture" is historically intransitive it may be that these usages are an early indication of a trend towards transforming it into a transitive verb - certainly "to lecture a course" seems to me to be more precise than "to teach a course" since it specifies the form of teaching, even if it still sits a bit uncomfortable - but then even during my lifetime I witnessed many words and constructions moving from sub-standard or even condemned to accepted standard.
This, however, doesn't mean that anything goes, just that what is acceptable is constantly changing. For the moment, however, I would avoid using this structure if I were you.
Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
Ray schrieb:

Hi, It has recently come to my attention that the ... see if there is any sign of non-native English speakers?

First of all I'd like to point out that as the links show we are talking here about English as ... me to be more precise than "to teach a course" since it specifies the form of teaching, even if it

Now my question is more specific: Why didn't the authors write "to lecture ON a course" the form described in the dictionary? Instead, they wrote "to lecture a course".
I want to know whether this transitive usage without "on" is common among native speakers of English when the object is a school subject.

Would you personally say "to lecture on a course" or "to lecture a course"?
Best,
Ray
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Ray schrieb: First of all I'd like to point out ... since it specifies the form of teaching, even if it

Now my question is more specific: Why didn't the authors write "to lecture ON a course" the form described in the dictionary? Instead, they wrote "to lecture a course".

Forget my above question. I didn't read your reply carefully. My fault.
I want to know whether this transitive usage without "on" is common among native speakers of English when the object is a school subject.

This is the question that really bothers me.
Secondly, however, English grammar is very flexible and readily absorbs new structures. while it is true that the verb "to ... than "to teach a course" since it specifies the form of teaching, even if it still sits a bit uncomfortable

uncomfortably?
- but then even during my lifetime I witnessed

have witnessed, unless you are posting from beyond the grave?

(Pace)
Owain
Ray schrieb:
Would you personally say "to lecture on a course" or "to lecture a course"?

I would say "to lecture on a particular topic", e.g. "to lecture on the the poetry of Ovid". If you're talking about the academic subject I'd say "he's a lecturer in sociology" or probably more likely "he's a sociology lecturer". But normally for me the verb "to lecture" is intransitive, has a personal object (I would think of it as the indirect object) or takes an object with "on" but the object is always for me something quite specific - I don't think I'd feel comfortable saying "he lectures on law" or "he lectures in law" - and definitely not "he lectures law" - but "the preacher regularly lectures young people on the evils of premarital sex".
Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
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Hi, It has recently come to my attention that the noun phrase "courses lectured in English" is rather common. As ... This is because "lecture" isn't a transitive verb. "Courses (which are) lectured in English" (incorrectly) implies it is a transitive.

Check a dictionary or two first. My Pocket Oxford and my paperback Random House both list 'lecture' as t & i.
Owain schrieb:

It is always advisable not to post too quickly after you rewrite parts of a sentence - particularly in a language newsgroup. :-(

Regards, Einde O'Callaghan
Hi, It has recently come to my attention that the ... are) lectured in English" (incorrectly) implies it is a transitive.

Check a dictionary or two first. My Pocket Oxford and my paperback Random House both list 'lecture' as t & i.

I believe the vt sense takes a human being, not something related to a subject, as its object in your dictionaries. And this vt sense is not what I asked about.
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