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AnonymousI also read that 'the' is only used for previously mentioned thngs.
No, not only. Having been previously mentioned is only one reason for using the. If your listener can deduce which entity you're referring to without a previous mention, you can use the.

I took a taxi to my hotel. I gave the driver a nice tip.

I have not previously mentioned anything about a driver. But do you ask "Which driver?" No. Does it make sense that I gave the tip to the driver of a different taxi? No. Of course the listener will know which driver I'm talking about!
AnonymousDo you think B and D below are the only reasonable combinations
No. A, B, C, and D are all possible. You may be uncertain about which statements are involved even though you're certain about which budgets are involved.
AnonymousE. My work includes daily checking of control reports. (= There are different kinds of control reports, and I'm not being specific as to which kind of control reports.)
F. My work includes daily checking of the control reports. (= There are different kinds of reports and I'm being specific that it's the control reports.)
G. My work includes daily checking of the control reports for unbooked items. (= There are different kinds of control reports, and I'm being specific that it's for unbooked items.)
These are all correct, and your reasoning is correct, but I would rephrase the part which you haven't even asked about: My work includes checking (the) control reports (for unbooked items) [daily / every day].
Anonymouscan I use 'the' in F even if the control reports are not previously mentioned in an interview, for example?
Yes, as explained above regarding previous mention.
AnonymousIf E and F are both reasonable, which would you more likely to say being aware of the kinds of reports and control reports?
In an interview you are talking about your skills and abilities in a general sort of way, so there's no need to emphasize that you worked with specific items. You're not at the interview to explain the details and specifics of the particular reports you're familiar with in your current position. You want to give the impression that you can handle any kind of material of the same general nature that the new company may want you to do. If the interviewer is interested in the specifics, he will ask. You can say this quite simply: I check control reports every day.

CJ
Thank you so much, CJ. As always, your explanations are comprehensive and very helpful especially to learners like me. I really appreciate your explaining this in detail. Just some follow-up questions below, if you could please help me with.

I.
CalifJim
AnonymousDo you think B and D below are the only reasonable combinations
No. A, B, C, and D are all possible. You may be uncertain about which statements are involved even though you're certain about which budgets are involved.
Do you think a simpler way of looking at this is as follows?

A. I review (different) statements for (different) yearly budgets
B. I review the (same or one kind of) statements for (different) yearly budgets.
C. I review (different) statements for the (same or one kind of) yearly budgets.
D. I review the (same or one kind of) statements for the (same or one kind of) yearly budgets.

II. Also, do you think my reasoning for the following is correct?

H. I check control reports for unbooked items every day. (= There are different kinds of control reports for system errors.)

I. I check the control reports for unbooked items every day. (= There is one kind of control reports for system errors.)

III. I appreciate your explanation that in an interview I need not to emphasize that I worked with specific items, but what if I just want to be clear that I handled only one kind of control reports for unbooked items, is it OK to say letter I? I understand the interviewer would not overanalyze this, though.
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IV. Just an additional question. I'm also trying to reconcile Mister Micawber's explanation about control reports with what you have already explained. He mentioned that 'the' can be used with "control reports" since it's a standard feature of many operations. Is the use of 'the', then, with control reports always correct because of many companies' familiarity with this kind of report? If so, regardless of whether there is one kind or different kinds of control reports, 'the control reports' is always correct because it's a familiar term to many operations. Would you agree? If not, what do you think could be the reason?
Hi CJ,

I was wondering if you could comment on my questions I to IV, please.
Just a correction in H and I, "system errors" should read as "unbooked items". Thank you.
AnonymousDo you think a simpler way of looking at this is as follows?
A. I review (different) statements for (different) yearly budgets
B. I review the (same or one kind of) statements for (different) yearly budgets.
C. I review (different) statements for the (same or one kind of) yearly budgets.
D. I review the (same or one kind of) statements for the (same or one kind of) yearly budgets.
Yes, I suppose you could think of it like that if it helps you understand it, but more accurately, "different" is "unspecified", and "same" is "certain, particular, specifically known".
AnonymousII. Also, do you think my reasoning for the following is correct?
H. I check control reports for unbooked items every day. (= There are different kinds of control reports for system errors unbooked items.)
I. I check the control reports for unbooked items every day. (= There is one kind of control reports for system errors unbooked items.)
"kinds of" doesn't quite give the meaning. In the first you're checking an unspecified group of reports, which very well may be different kinds. You may be checking some or all of these. In the second you're checking a specific group that you have in mind when you say "the control reports", and you're checking all of them in that group.
AnonymousIII. I appreciate your explanation that in an interview I need not to emphasize that I worked with specific items, but what if I just want to be clear that I handled only one kind of control reports for unbooked items, is it OK to say letter I? I understand the interviewer would not overanalyze this, though.
If you say I, you're just saying that there was a specific group of control reports that you were responsible for checking, and you checked them (all). Your interviewer will have no idea which these are, but he'll trust that you know which they are. Your interviewer will not assume that you handled either one kind or two kinds or many kinds of such reports. He has no idea how many kinds were used in your current or former company. He only knows that you handled the ones that you handled, so to speak.

If you want to be clear that you handled only one kind of control reports, then you have to tell him that specifically.
_____________

You have to keep in mind at all times that the indicates that you know which one or which group you're talking about and that your listener knows which too or can make an intelligent guess about which one(s) you're talking about. It's all got to do with which.

If you say "the X", and your listener asks "which X?" then you have used "the" incorrectly or the listener hasn't been able to deduce which X as easily as you thought he might. Basically, you use the to stop your listener from asking "Which?" Your use of "the" tells the listener (indirectly) that he should use his brain to figure out which thing you're talking about from the situation he and you are in.

CJ
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Thank you very much, CJ, for your explanations. As always, they are really helpful and I appreciate that. I can see some other implied meanings when one uses the article 'the'.
CalifJimYou have to keep in mind at all times that the indicates that you know which one or which group you're talking about and that your listener knows which too or can make an intelligent guess about which one(s) you're talking about. It's all got to do with which.
V. I understand that the question to keep in mind is "which one(s)?". Just to check if I've understood clearly, which could be the more likely question for the words in bold in the example below: "which analysts?" or "which Houston analysts?"?

I improved the system process in the department. From then on, the Houston analysts could directly communicate with the traders. Before, a Houston analyst had to go through the supervisor if he had an issue requiring the assistance of a trader.
Note: There is one supervisor in a team with at least four Houston analysts handling different accounts. Each account has one corresponding trader to contact in case of issues. The interviewer is not aware of this, though.

VI. If it's "which analysts?", then it's correct to say "the Houston analysts". Please confirm.
VII. If it's "which Houston analysts?", then is it also correct to say "the Houston analysts" since the interviewer can deduce, I think, that it's specifically the Houston analysts of the department I was part of, and supposing I told him earlier that I was also a Houston analyst myself.
VIII. If my interpretations are incorrect, should I simply say "Houston analysts" omitting 'the'? However, this might mean that I'm referring to the Houston analysts of another department, which doesn't make sense.
IX. If you were the interviewer, do you think you could make an intelligent guess about which ones I'm talking about with regard to the words I used 'the' with?

X. If you could, please check, as well, on the other articles in my example, or kindly improve them, if necessary. Thank you very much in advance for your time and patience.
Anonymouswhich could be the more likely question for the words in bold in the example below: "which analysts?" or "which Houston analysts?"?
I'm not sure I understand the question.

If you say the Houston analysts, the response will not likely be either of those. The listener will assume that there is some unique group of analysts in Houston, and that's who you're talking about. I don't think such a phrase would be questioned with "Which?"
Anonymous should I simply say "Houston analysts" omitting 'the'?
I would not say that. No.
AnonymousIf you were the interviewer, do you think you could make an intelligent guess about which ones I'm talking about with regard to the words I used 'the' with?
Yes. I'm assuming there is one particular supervisor, for example, since you used the supervisor. If there were several supervisors, and any one of them would do, you would have said a supervisor.
Anonymouscheck, as well, on the other articles
Done. No problems.

CJ
Thank you, CJ, for you assistance and for checking on the rest of the articles, as well. I really appreciate it. I'm more confident that I understand the topic now, very well, from what you've explained.
CalifJimI'm assuming there is one particular supervisor, for example, since you used the supervisor. If there were several supervisors, and any one of them would do, you would have said a supervisor.
If there is only one trader to be contacted for each account handled by a Houston analyst, can I change "a trader" to "the trader" in the last sentence of the example below? Although there are several traders for several accounts, there's only one trader for each account.

I improved the system process in the department. From then on, the Houston analysts could directly communicate with the traders. Before, a Houston analyst had to go through the supervisor if he had an issue requiring the assistance of a trader.
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Anonymouscan I change "a trader" to "the trader" in the last sentence of the example below?
Yes, you can.

CJ
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