A. I review statements for yearly budgets.
B. I review the statements for yearly budgets.

1. If I have not previously mentioned about 'statements for yearly budgets', should I say the first sentence A without 'the'?
2. Or should I say the second sentence B with 'the' because they are the specific statements for yearly budgets?
3. What is the actual difference between A and B if my interpretations are incorrect?
4. Also, should I add 'the' before 'yearly budgets'?

I review statements for the yearly budgets.
I review the statements for the yearly budgets.
1 2 3
My work includes daily checking of a control report.
My work includes daily checking of the control report.

My work includes daily checking of control reports.

My work includes daily checking of the control reports.

1. If it is the first time that I mentioned about "control report(s)" in an interview, can I still use the sentences with 'the'?
2. My reason for using 'the', even if I mentioned "control report(s)" for the first time, is because in my mind, I'm thinking of the report(s) specifically received by our group. Is it correct, then, to use 'the' in this case?

Please advise. Thanks.
If it is a well-defined group of a certain number of statements, then you review the statements. You are thinking of a specific group of statements.

If sometimes you have two statements of one kind, and sometimes 15 different kinds, and sometimes eight of one kind and three of another kind, so that there is no set group, then you review statements. You are not thinking of a specific group of statements.

Likewise for the budgets.
If you do this for the same yearly budget every year, then it's for the yearly budgets. You are thinking of a particular set of yearly budgets.

If you do this for a variety of different yearly budgets, for example, the budgets of different companies or departments, whichever companies or departments want you to do this in a particular year, then it's for yearly budgets. You are not thinking of any particular set of yearly budgets.

CJ
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1-- No one will notice if you do; control reports are a standard feature of many operations.
2-- Not for your reason; for my reason (given in #1).
Thanks so much for your helpful response.
CalifJimIf it is a well-defined group of a certain number of statements, then you review the statements. You are thinking of a specific group of statements.
CalifJimLikewise for the budgets.
If you do this for the same yearly budget every year, then it's for the yearly budgets. You are thinking of a particular set of yearly budgets.
1. Is using 'the' in your explanation regardless of whether the statements/budgets were first mentioned in a discussion or not, meaning 'the' can be used as long as I'm describing a well-defined or specific set of statements/budgets? Because I also read that 'the' is only used for previously mentioned thngs.

2. Do you think B and D below are the only reasonable combinations since they are "for (the) yearly budgets", that makes the statements specific so 'the statements' is used?

A. I review statements for yearly budgets
B. I review the statements for yearly budgets.
C. I review statements for the yearly budgets.
D. I review the statements for the yearly budgets.

3. I'm sorry if the next example below is very detailed. I just wanted to have a clear picture of the correct usage of the article 'the'. Thanks so much for your patience.

Kinds of reports: budget reports, expense reports, control reports
Kinds of control reports: unbooked items report, duplicate items report, errors report

With the different reports given above, which of the following sentences are correct to say?

E. My work includes daily checking of control reports. (= There are different kinds of control reports, and I'm not being specific as to which kind of control reports.)
F. My work includes daily checking of the control reports. (= There are different kinds of reports and I'm being specific that it's the control reports.)
G. My work includes daily checking of the control reports for unbooked items. (= There are different kinds of control reports, and I'm being specific that it's for unbooked items.)

4. Again, can I use 'the' in F even if the control reports are not previously mentioned in an interview, for example?
5. If E and F are both reasonable, which would you more likely to say being aware of the kinds of reports and control reports?

I would very much appreciate your assistance.
I'm sorry I was not able to read this before I posted a question in another similar thread, but thanks so much for your response here.
Mister Micawber1-- No one will notice if you do; control reports are a standard feature of many operations.
3. Does it mean that regardless of whether "control reports" is previously mentioned or not, 'the' should be used since they are a standard feature of many operations?

4. If "control reports" with no 'the' is also OK, do you think 'the' is required then if I add an additional phrase making the control report more specific?
My work includes daily checking of the control reports for system errors.
But NOT: My work includes daily checking of control reports for system errors.

5. If both below are OK, how does 'the' actually change the meaning of the sentence?
My work includes daily checking of control reports.
My work includes daily checking of the control reports.
Try out our live chat room.
Give me a link to that thread so that I can join them.
Hi Mister Micawber,

Here is the link. Thanks.

http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/TheVsNoThe/xmkkk/post.htm
Hi Mister Micawber,

Could you comment on this, please? Thank you.
Anonymous
Mister Micawber1-- No one will notice if you do; control reports are a standard feature of many operations.
3. Does it mean that regardless of whether "control reports" is previously mentioned or not, 'the' should be used since they are a standard feature of many operations?

4. If "control reports" with no 'the' is also OK, do you think 'the' is required then if I add an additional phrase making the control report more specific?
My work includes daily checking of the control reports for system errors.
But NOT: My work includes daily checking of control reports for system errors.

5. If both below are OK, how does 'the' actually change the meaning of the sentence?
My work includes daily checking of control reports.
My work includes daily checking of the control reports.
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