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When pronouncing "the" before "young" is it "thuh young" or "thee young"? As in "thuh young duke" or "thee young duke"; "thuh young and thuh restless" or "thee young and thuh restless"; "thuh young and thee old" or "thee young and thee old"?

If the correct usage is "thee" is it because of a specific rule? Or is it the standard "use thuh before a consonant" and "use thee before a vowel"?
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AnonymousWhen pronouncing "the" before "young" is it "thuh young" or "thee young"? As in "thuh young duke" or "thee young duke"; "thuh young and thuh restless" or "thee young and thuh restless"; "thuh young and thee old" or "thee young and thee old"?

If the correct usage is "thee" is it because of a specific rule? Or is it the standard "use thuh before a consonant" and "use thee before a vowel"?

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thuh young
thuh restless
thee old

Careful: This rule goes by sound, not by spelling. So if an initial vowel sound is spelled with a consonant letter, you still use 'thee' ('thee' honor); if a consonant sound is spelled with a vowel letter, you still use 'thuh' ('thuh' one I like).

CJ
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Comments  

Most internet posts indicate that "the" precedes a consonant and "thee" precedes a vowel sound, but that's not "the" way we use those words in Midwestern America.


"The" means of normal importance. "Thee" means of increased importance. That's what I was taught all the way through elementary school. It's how people speak.


My wife is "thee" most important person in my life.

Get me "thee" apple, not "the" banana!

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anonymousMidwestern America

What a strange idea. Emotion: tongue tied I grew up in the Midwest and I've never heard anyone speak in the manner you describe.

CJ