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Mark Knopfler of a group called Dire Straits sings on one of the songs: "He do the walk of life." I have been told by a couple of Brits that the walk of life means nothing. Are there other opinions? It's certainly all Greek to me.

Cheers
CB
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Cool BreezeMark Knopfler of a group called Dire Straits sings on one of the songs: "He do the walk of life." I have been told by a couple of Brits that the walk of life means nothing. Are there other opinions? It's certainly all Greek to me.

Cheers
CB
"talk the talk" = have a lot to say about how things are, how they should change, even be opinionated.

"walk the walk" = do something about the above.

"he do the walk of life" = he does what he can

If it really is "do" instead of "does" (I don't know the song), then it's colloquial
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Hi Philip

Thanks for the reply. Knopfler does sing he do the walk of life because it is shorter and comes effortlessly from his lips, I suppose. The name of the song is Walk Of Life. Dire Straits is an English group and recorded the song about 20 years ago.

Cheers
CB
As a small aside Mark Knoppfler is from Newcastle, one of the northernmost English cities. For such a small country, England exhibits an extraordinary diversity of regional dialects; "Geordie" (as the Newcastle version is known) is one of the most distinctive, retaining many Old English and Viking phrases as part of the local slang lexicon. A few others (there are many) would be "Brummie," for the area around Birmingham; "Scouse" for Liverpool; and "Cockney" for parts of London. It should be noted that this sounds absolutely nothing like the Cockney served up by Dick van Dyke in "Mary Poppins"!
Yes The Walk of Life was an expedition from Londoin to Khartoum 1985-1986 to raise money for famine relief. Five guys walked all the way, 2.500 miles! Walk led by John Abbey. Dire Straits supported the walk by donating a gold disc (Brothers in Arms)
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