+0
The wind is turning my umbrella inside out.

My umbrella is turned inside out by the wind.

Do both of the above sound right and mean about the same? Is it also identical to write the following? Thanks.

My umbrella is turning inside out by/over/with/in the wind.
+0
Only if changed a bit:

My umbrella is being turned inside out by the wind.
+0
Hi Angliholic,

1. With passive voice, 'by' would agree well.
2. I don't see how 'over' would fit in your sentence.
3. The usage of 'with' carries the meaning of along / together / augementation / complimentation ... So it does not fit either in the context of your sentence. I would entertain the idea that 'the unbrella turns [not turns inside out]with the wind'.
4. I would use 'in' to describe 'being surrounded by the wind'.

All the best,
Hoa Thai
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Comments  
Marius HancuOnly if changed a bit:

My umbrella is being turned inside out by the wind.
Thanks, Marius.

But do the following sound equally good and mean about the same?

My umbrella is turning inside out by/over/with/in the wind.
 Hoa Thai's reply was promoted to an answer.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Hoa ThaiHi Angliholic,

1. With passive voice, 'by' would agree well.
2. I don't see how 'over' would fit in your sentence.
3. The usage of 'with' carries the meaning of along / together / augementation / complimentation ... So it does not fit either in the context of your sentence. I would entertain the idea that 'the unbrella turns [not turns inside out]with the wind'.
4. I would use 'in' to describe 'being surrounded by the wind'.

All the best,
Hoa Thai

Thanks, Hoa.

Roger!