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Grammars usually say that we should use the definite article THE before the names of newspapers: The Hindu, The Indian Express, The New York Times, etc.
But one grammar written by an Englishman says that THE should not be used if THE is not a part of the name of newspaper. The UK newspapers DAILY MAIL and DAILY MIRROR have no article with the title. So we should write "I usually read Daily Mirror, not Daily Mail." At the same time, I can say "I do not read The Guardian" because the title has THE with it.
Another grammar written by another Englishman says that THE should be used with the title of all newspapers. In his opinion, THE should be capitalized when the title of a newspaper has THE as a part of the title. So we should write The Guardian, The Independent, The Sun, etc. He says that THE should not be capitalized when the title of a newspaper is not preceded by THE. So we should write the Dailly Mirror, the Daily Mail, the Chicago Tribune, etc.
My question is who we should follow. Should we use THE uncapitalized or avoid using it before the name of newspapers without THE in the title?
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I follow the 3rd system: THE should be used with the title of all newspapers. THE should be capitalized when the title of a newspaper has THE as a part of the title.
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I go along with Mr M, plus: The should not be used in the names of foreign-language newspapers if the name contains a foreign article: I read Die Welt. If such a name has no article, the is optional: I read [the] Helsingin Sanomat.

CB
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You have asked a great question, O.ABOOTTY:

Here in the United States of America, the most important newspaper has this official name on the front page:

The New York Times. So a few people (such as I) would write: I read an interesting article in The New York Times

today. But I am 99.99% sure that most Americans would write: I read an interesting article in the New York Times today.

Of course, sometimes it is impossible to be "correct." I could not possibly write: I read an interesting article in yesterday's

The New York Times. I would be forced to simply write: I read an interesting article in yesterday's New York Times.

*****

My local newspaper has this official name: Los Angeles Times. Thus, we would write: I read an article in the Los Angeles

Times. Usually, one uses the definite article with the name of a newspaper. But, of course, there are exceptions to the

rule. One of our most popular newspapers is called USA TODAY. One would say: I read an article in USA TODAY about

the situation in ...."

*****

As you know, in England there is a newspaper with this nameplate on the front page: The Times. Well, again, a few

people today continue to write: There was an interesting article today in The Times. But I have noticed most people simply

write: Did you read the article in the Times this morning?

*****

Someone once wrote something very humorous. He said that if you wanted to be 100% correct, you should write:

I read it in the The Times this morning. Of course, no native speaker would ever accept that!

HAVE A NICE DAY! (I hope that you ask more questions about newspapers -- my favorite subject.)
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Names of newspapers also take italics. The "the" is not only captialized, it is also italicized if it is part of the name, and not if not: The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, the Los Angeles Times, the Houston Chronicle.

While we're on the subject, it is pemitted to add the name of the city to the name of a US paper in the US even if it is not in the official name: The Newark Star-Ledger, The Baltimore Sun. It just makes things easier, so you don't have to go through any gyrations to get the city in there, like "The Sun of Baltimore", which sounds stupid.

There are newspapers that never take "the" at all, like USA Today.
James MYou have asked a great question, O.ABOOTTY:Here in the United States of America, the most important newspaper has this official name on the front page:The New York Times. So a few people (such as I) would write: I read an interesting article in The New York Timestoday. But I am 99.99% sure that most Americans would write: I read an interesting article in the New York Times today.Of course, sometimes it is impossible to be "correct." I could not possibly write: I read an interesting article in yesterday'sThe New York Times. I would be forced to simply write: I read an interesting article in yesterday's New York Times.*****My local newspaper has this official name: Los Angeles Times. Thus, we would write: I read an article in the Los AngelesTimes. Usually, one uses the definite article with the name of a newspaper. But, of course, there are exceptions to therule. One of our most popular newspapers is called USA TODAY. One would say: I read an article in USA TODAY aboutthe situation in ...."*****As you know, in England there is a newspaper with this nameplate on the front page: The Times. Well, again, a fewpeople today continue to write: There was an interesting article today in The Times. But I have noticed most people simplywrite: Did you read the article in the Times this morning?*****Someone once wrote something very humorous. He said that if you wanted to be 100% correct, you should write:I read it in the The Times this morning. Of course, no native speaker would ever accept that!HAVE A NICE DAY! (I hope that you ask more questions about newspapers -- my favorite subject.)

Thank you very much for your detailed reply.