Hello,
The word etude: meaning: musical piece intended to aid student in learning an instrument
Could anybody give an illustrative sentence how this word could be used.
Thanks.
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chivalc typed thus:
Hello, The word etude: meaning: musical piece intended to aid student in learning an instrument Could anybody give an illustrative sentence how this word could be used.

It's a French word meaning "a study": it is a piece which the student plays to aid in technique and ability, rather than for its musical merit.
Sorry if I'm wrong, but this sounds like a homework question, so I'll ask you to reply with some ideas for how this might be used in a sentence.

David
==
Well, strictly speaking, it's a French word. We use it to refer to pieces given that title by the composer.
So, to answer your question, we might say:
"I spent the evening learning one of Chopin's études."

But in English, a "musical piece intended to aid student in learning an instrument" would simply be a "study". We wouldn't call it an "étude" if it was written by, say, Arnold Clunchbucket or Mary Grimtwinge - unless they, for pretentious reasons, called it such in the title.
Peasemarch.
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The word etude: meaning: musical piece intended to aid student ... give an illustrative sentence how this word could be used.

It's a French word meaning "a study": it is a piece which the student plays to aid in technique and ability, rather than for its musical merit.

It is indeed the French word for "study" (the noun, not the verb). It is a musical piece intended to stress a particular point in musical technique, but it is not the same as an "exercise".
An étude is usually intended as an actual musical work to be performed. In the case of Chopin, who wrote twenty-seven of them, they can actually be extremely beautiful and have marked musical merit (they are some of his earliest and most celebrated works).
It's interesting to note that many French words that begin with an é with an accent aigu (but not words with a plain e) can be converted to a close facsimile to their English counterparts simply by changing the é to an s.

étude = study
école = school
ésprit = spirit
etc...
Don
Kansas City
Don A. Gilmore typed thus:
It's interesting to note that many French words that begin with an =E9 wi=th an accent aigu (but not words ... their English counterparts simply by changing the =E9 to an =s. =E9tude =3D study =E9cole =3D school =E9sprit =3D spirit

Quite.
and:
=E9cole =3D school =3DWelsh "ysgol"
and, BTW:
=E9glise =3DWelsh "eglwys"
=20
David
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D
Don Gilmore:
It's interesting to note that many French words that begin with an é with an accent aigu (but not words with a plain e) can be converted to a close facsimile to their English counterparts simply by changing the é to an s.

If you know that some of the accented e's in French were originally "es", you are halfway to seeing why. The other half is that in English we are happy to start a word with S and another consonant, whereas some other languages tend to require an unstressed E before that, so those E's may go away when the word moves into English ("Spain" is another example).
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Hello, The word etude: meaning: musical piece intended to aid student in learning an instrument Could anybody give an illustrative sentence how this word could be used.

Etudes for public performance as well as for private practice were written by Chopin, Debussy, and Liszt.
Chopin's best known etudes are in two sets of twelve, op.(1) 10 and 25. These are usually considered to represent the beginning of what is called the "Concert Etude."
(1) It has become customary when writing out the plural of "opus" to use "opuses" rather the the Latin plural "opera" avoiding confusion with another art form. Note that "opera" has itself become a singular word even in Italian, where its plural is "opere." I avoid all this by using "op.".
"Etude No.3 in A minor for the guitar, by JS Bach, is a good arpeggio exercise"
"I'm a guitar teacher and composed this small étude intended to help guitar students perfect their apoyando technique".
"chivalc" (Email Removed) a écrit dans le message de
ésprit = spirit

it's not "ésprit", it's "esprit" (without an é but with a plain e).
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