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My husband and I have had a disagreement about a message. My father's wife wrote a Happy Birthday message to my husband. Here is the message I wrote back: "Hi Cindy, thank you for the birthday wishes for Jase...". My husband who is a New Zealander read this as me thanking her on his behalf, where as I was actually thanking her myself, for the birthday wishes which were for him. Which way do you read it?

I think there is a slight language barrier and although we both speak English, coming from different parts of the world could cause it to be read differently, which is why we disagree.

Thank you,

Haven
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Hi,

My husband and I have had a disagreement about a message. My father's wife wrote a Happy Birthday message to my husband. Here is the message I wrote back: "Hi Cindy, thank you for the birthday wishes for Jase...". My husband who is a New Zealander read this as me thanking her on his behalf, where as I was actually thanking her myself, for the birthday wishes which were for him. Which way do you read it? The same way you do.

If I meant it the other way, I'd say

eg, "thank you on behalf of Jase for the birthday wishes" .

eg, "thank you from Jase for the birthday wishes" .

Clive

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Welcome to English Forums, 562haven.

Sorry, no email links in posts and no responses via email. We like other members to read the Qs and As. However, I will try to tie this thread to your other thread if I can find it.

PS: Mission accomplished.
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Hi, I posted the question about the word "for" a few mintues ago, but as I hadn't signed up I realised that I wouldn't receive any email replies. Now that I've signed up can you please link my email address to my first post?
Many thanks,

Haven
Thanks, Clive. I am the one who posted the message and I'm sure this will either shut my husband up or create another argument Emotion: smirking.
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 Mister Micawber's reply was promoted to an answer.