The word "swastika" was a misleading translation of "hakenkreuze." The obvious translation should have been "hooked cross." The monstrous National Socialist German Workers' Party always used the word "hakenkreuze" and never used the word "swastika" and there is not evidence they even knew the latter term. The deceptive translation led to the "swastika myth" that the National Socialist German Workers' Party adopted the symbol because it was an ancient symbol meaning "good luck." That myth has been debunked
http://rexcurry.net/swastikanews.html
and http://rexcurry.net/socialism-posters/posters2.html

and with pre-1933 National Socialist posters at
http://rexcurry.net/socialist-propaganda/posters1.html

and http://rexcurry.net/socialism/germany.html
and http://rexcurry.net/swastikacross.html
The swastika myth covers-up the fact that, for the National Socialist German Workers' Party, the hakenkreuze represented overlapping "S" shapes symbolizing "socialism." Eschew the word "swastika" in any discussion of the The monstrous National Socialist German Workers' Party.
By the way, whenever this topic arises, it is funny to see how many responses simply write that the swastika was an ancient symbol. Usually some putzes post that "the swastika was an ancient symbol" followed by cut and paste. Everyone is aware that the swastika was an ancient symbol. It only shows that the putz posters completely miss the point.
(Oppose socialism and support libertarianism. To learn more see Rex Curry at http://rexcurry.net or contact (Email Removed) or (Email Removed) or (Email Removed) ).
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The word "swastika" was a misleading translation of "hakenkreuze." The obvious translation should have been "hooked cross." The monstrous National ... German Workers' Party adopted the symbol because it was an ancient symbol meaning "good luck." That myth has been debunked

Wouldn't "crooked cross" be a more euphoneousd and alliterative English rendering?

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Yes. I mention that on my webpage. A person wrote in: "British propaganda of WWII that I've read used 'crooked cross.' " So in fact the English language did use "crooked cross" also.

Hitler did not use the word "swastika." Hitler used the German word "hakenkreuz." The most literal translation is "hooked cross." Most readers intuitively understand "hooked cross" or "crooked cross" or even "hakenkreuz," but not "swastika." There is no evidence that Hitler knew "swastika."
A Hakenkreuz is not a swastika. A swastika can point left or right, and historically sits flat on one side in a square shape.

Thanks for your comment.
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The word "swastika" was a misleading translation of "hakenkreuze." The ... ancient symbol meaning "good luck." That myth has been debunked

This is one of the minor errors in the web site.
However named, the symbol was a traditional
Indian or Aryan symbol for good luck, adopted
for this reason by the author Rudyard Kipling
(appearing on the covers of sets of his books)

20 years before the Nazis appeared in Germany.(A small town in northern Ontario was named
Swastika a century ago and during WW2 decided
that, enjoying priority, it need not change its name.)

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
This is one of the minor errors in the web site. However named, the symbol was a traditional Indian or ... author Rudyard Kipling (appearing on the covers of sets of his books) 20 years before the Nazis appeared in Germany.

I allus heard that what Kipling had on his books was not a swastika but a good-luck fylfot, and that the difference was they bent contrary ways although, to my surprise,

flatly contradicts this.
I have a vague race memory that the Finnish Air Force used swastikas before the Luftwaffe.
I recently read somewhere that Kipling took the fylfot off his books post WWII cuz it was so widely misunderstood. He muster bin damn' old by then.
snip
I recently read somewhere that Kipling took the fylfot off his books post WWII cuz it was so widely misunderstood.

Must have been pre-war, once the Nazis adopted it he died in 1936, aged 70 or 71.

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 22 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey.news to harvey.van)
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I recently read somewhere that Kipling took the fylfot off his books post WWII cuz it was so widely misunderstood.

Must have been pre-war, once the Nazis adopted it he died in 1936, aged 70 or 71.

By George^H^H^H^H^H^HSt. Helena of Constantinople, he's got it. More stuff at
http://www.kipling.org.uk/facts swastik.htm
including yet another a different form of the crooked cross at he top of the page.
On 13 Mar 2005, Father Ignatius wrote snip

I recently read somewhere that Kipling took the fylfot off his books post WWII cuz it was so widely misunderstood.

Must have been pre-war, once the Nazis adopted it he died in1936, aged 70 or 71.

And the crem was particularly busy that day, I believe: so that the staff had no time to remove the red flags which had been put out for the previous ceremony which had been for an Indian Communist.

Mike.
Must have been pre-war, once the Nazis adopted it he died in 1936, aged 70 or 71.

By George[/nq]^H^H^H^H^H^HSt. Helena of Constantinople, he's got it. More
stuff at http://www.kipling.org.uk/facts swastik.htm including yet another a different form of the crooked cross at he top of the page.

The symbol, sometimes pointing to the right, sometimes the left, has been known in Latvian culture (its arts and crafts) since the 3rd or 4th century. It has enjoyed several names, translating to firecross, thundercross, svastika (Latvian spelling), and branched cross. It has a definite connection with pagan beliefs.
Some examples are at http://ai1.mii.lu.lv/kultura/orn11.htm The small pictures are clickable for seeing larger versions.

The symbol was used also by the Latvian Air Force, starting in 1919 and ending in 1940.
http://www.insigniamag.com/afs005.html

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
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