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Do you get the feeling that the end of the world is just around the corner? Look at the major disasters around the world this year alone, the devastating cyclone in Myanmar, the deadly earthquake in China, heavy storms ripping across the US, wars and conflicts around the globe, food crisis in Africa, etc, Some of these have never happened in the areas before. Take the SziChuan earthquake for an example. Never in the history of the peaceful province had a quake of that magnitude occurred before.

Are there any mistakes?

Thanks.
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Do you get the feeling that the end of the world is just around the corner? Look at the major disasters around the world this year alone, the devastating cyclone in Myanmar, the deadly earthquake in China, heavy storms ripping across the US, wars and conflicts around the globe, the food crisis in Africa. etc, Some of these have never happened in the areas in those areas before. Take the SziChuan earthquake, for an example. Never before in the history of the peaceful that quiet province had a quake of that magnitude occurred before.
peaceful seems to indicate 'not warlike', which is not relevant to a natural disaster.
quiet might better express seismic inactivity, which is probably more to the point.
I didn't like two sentences ending with before, so I changed one. (happened ... before / occurred before)
You might put a colon instead of a comma after this year alone.
CJ
Thanks, CJ for the corrections. I have been putting off this question for quite some time, thinking that I wasn't an important issue. I think, now is a good time to address this issue of 'the vs that/those'

Take "in the areas" for example. Since the areas/countries are listed before the phrase is used, I can't understand why those is preferred. Similarly, the SziChuan province has been mentioned several times in the piece, why THAT quiet province?
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you've mentioned them: that/those
you'll mention them (starting right now): this/these
Thank you, MH. Though I agree with your reply, that's not my question.

you've mentioned them: that/those (My question is why that/those instead of THE which grammar tells us to use)

you'll mention them (starting right now): this/these
New2grammarTake "in the areas" for example. Since the areas/countries are listed before the phrase is used, I can't understand why those is preferred. Similarly, the SziChuan province has been mentioned several times in the piece, why THAT quiet province?
I hate it when someone asks a question I don't have a good answer to!!! Emotion: smile Well, on second thought, maybe I do have a good answer. I'll let you decide.

As MH said, that and those have to do with the idea of "aforementioned". Yet, the itself also contains that concept. Still, that and those emphasize it.
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I believe the preference has to do with changing the specific word to a more general category word that refers to the entities in question. (areas in this case.)

After saying, for example:
I looked in books, magazines, and letters to find the answer.
if you then said:
In the documents, I found ...
it would not be clear that documents referred to the same entities that books, magazines, and letters referred to. Maybe there were other documents, and these were different from the books, magazines, and letters.

So the better choice is:
In those documents, I found ...
Similarly,
The police checked warehouses, factories, churches, and homes. They did not find anything suspicious in the those buildings.
The carpenter brought a hammer, a saw, and a plane, but the those tools were of no use to him on this particular job.
On the table were various kinds of chicken, pork, and beef for us to choose from. However, I found that none of the those dishes were very fresh tasting.
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In the cases above, buildings, tools, and dishes are all words that talk about the previously mentioned things from the viewpoint of a more general category.
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The quiet province case is just a little different, I think. You could almost get away with the. Here it is probably the addition of the descriptor quiet that leads me to prefer that. We don't know if there are two provinces under consideration: SziChuan province and the quiet province. The use of that assures us that the two descriptions refer to the same entity. There is a broad similarity with the previous cases, however, because there is a change from something very specific -- SziChuan -- to something more general -- province.
Compare again:
I would like to live in Chicago. I have always liked the that beautiful city.
Susan has a garden full of roses because she loves the those sweet scented flowers best.
Karen's car has had problems ever since she bought it. She is really tired of the that unreliable heap of junk!
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the is almost possible in this last group, but it is a little less clear, I think, and seems more literary or poetic than desirable in the given context.
CJ
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WOW! Great explanation. I've never understood this topic as clear as this. Of course, it will take a while to get used to.

Thanks, CJ!!
CJ, Unfortunate, I came across a counterexample

It's very difficult to know how many there are left in the world," Derek said. "Some studies show that in the past 20 years, they're down 90 percent. They reproduce very slowly. I think that unless people just stop eating the (shark fin) soup, I don't think the species has a chance."

While it is illegal to traffic shark fins into the United States, enforcing the law is difficult once the animal parts make it into the country.

Why not 'those animal parts'?

Thanks.
The animal parts is a bit less specific than those animal parts, also a bit more detached/neutral. Matter of choice.
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