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To my way of thinking, the following use of “yourself” and “myself” is wrong and sounds really clumsy:

A. This morning I sent a reply to yourself.

A. This morning you sent a reply to myself.

Surely these should be:

B. This morning I sent a reply to you.

B. This morning you sent a reply to me.

My dictionary says something like this (from memory) under its entry for “yourself”:

- (a) used as the object of a verb or preposition when this is the same as the subject of the clause and the subject is the person or people being addressed. (b) used by way of emphasis as in, “You do it yourself.”

The use as in A. seems to have completely swamped the use as in B., so that I no longer hear B. I feel exceedingly uncomfortable with this, almost to the point of finding it annoying. Is this irritation misplaced?

Regards,

Doug
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I actually read this in print here in . It was in one of the reviews of a certain book, printed at the back of the book:

“I wrote a personal letter of thanks to himself.” !!!!

It seems as if I am the only one in who does not use the –self forms outside of their reflexive or intensive use. I cannot find anyone here like me, who sees things from my point of view, my dear wife excepted.

I find this REALLY irritating. Is this – my irritation – a sign of personal insecurity in the face of change?
I know I'm replying to a long dead thread but this really annoys me. I have a letter from my bank that says "further to the letter from yourself to ourselves..." that I pull out in moments of high emotion (when I'm drunk, obviously!) illustrate the decline of the English language.

Watch out for people using the 3rd person singular 'One' instead of 'I'. One first noticed it a few months ago and one has noticed it creep into where I work myself over the last three weeks.
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Hi,
I know I'm replying to a long dead thread but this really annoys me. I have a letter from my bank that says "further to the letter from yourself to ourselves..." that I pull out in moments of high emotion (when I'm drunk, obviously!) illustrate the decline of the English language.No kidding. That's terrible.

Watch out for people using the 3rd person singular 'One' instead of 'I'. One first noticed it a few months ago and one has noticed it creep into where I work myself over the last three weeks. Actually, this seems to me like a very old-established usage. I think it has its uses, although it can certainly be overdone.
Would you object to 'One should always be polite'?

Best wishes, Clive
Yeah, I'm with Clive on the "one" issue. In my experience, "one" does not use it to avoid the use of "I" but to avoid the use of "you."

You should pay attention to the road and not your cell phone while driving sounds like I think you may do this. But One should pay attention to the road and not one's cell phone is neutral.

Are you really find it replacing "I" or it is actually replacing "you"?
Hi,

When I lived in Britain, using 'one' to sometimes replace 'I' was commonly considered a mark of higher register (ie an upper-class usage, in Brit-speak). Some people, including me, still do it occasionally, often to show a cold kind of formality, perhaps because of anger.

Best wishes, Clive
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Thank yourself to all those who have answered my thread!
I have started to sound like my father. Asking question's like. I'm happy to wait if Yourself is busy, so I can talk to him directly? It grates.
- EXAMPLE -

BANK Phone staff: I'm happy to discuss your account details and future requirements with yourself.
ME: I'm happy to wait if Yourself is busy, so I can talk to him directly?
BANK Phone staff: Err, what.
ME:Oh brother.
Hi,
That sounds a bit like a conversation between two stage Irishmen.

Stage Irishmen say things like 'Sure and herself (my wife) will murder me if Oi'm late for me supper. Oi'll just have anither quick pint o' Guiness'.

Clive
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No, your irritation is not misplaced. The misuse of "yourself" and "myself" makes me crazy. And the people who do it are often quite educated. Often individuals in upper management in health care. I suspect they feel they sound more intelligent using these words rather than "you" or "me".

Jeff in Kelowna, Canada
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