+0

Hi. Are they correct? Please see the underlined parts. Thank you in advance for your help.

1. Both tried to spread their view on the story.

2. Both tried to spread their views on the story.

3. Both tried to spread their individual views on the story.

+0
anonymousAre they correct?

They are.

CJ

Comments  
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.

Thank you again. Would you say all three of them carry an idea of each having tried to spread his or her individual view on the story, although, I think, no. 2 could also be (literally?) interpreted as either or both having more than one view (although it is unlikely)? Thank you in advance again for your help.

1. Both tried to spread their view on the story.

2. Both tried to spread their views on the story.

3. Both tried to spread their individual views on the story.

anonymousWould you say all three of them carry an idea of each having tried to spread his or her individual view on the story

They can in the right context, but if you examine them very carefully under a microscope, they're all ambiguous, as I think you already know.

anonymousno. 2 could also be (literally?) interpreted as either or both having more than one view

Yes.


1. Both tried to spread their view on the story.
Both A and B tried to spread the view shared by A and B.
Each of A and B tried to spread the view shared by A and B.
Each of A and B tried to spread his own particular view.

And likewise for 2 and 3 with possibly even more interpretations.

The many interpretations are left as an exercise to the reader. Emotion: smile

CJ

CalifJimanonymousWould you say all three of them carry an idea of each having tried to spread his or her individual view on the storyThey can in the right context, but if you examine them very carefully under a microscope, they're all ambiguous, as I think you already know.

Excellent. Thank you again. Let's focus on example sentence 1. Would you say all of these variations of sentence 1, which was "Both tried to spread their view on the story," are correct in conveying the sense of each having tried to spread his or her individual view on the story, among many others? I think the last one with the pronoun "all" is not correct. I say it because I believe I asked almost the same questions before in this forum and received an answer saying they are incorrect. Also, I believe I didn't receive a clear answer as to why that is in the replies. Maybe you could help me. Thank you in advance again for your help.

1. Both tried to spread their view on the story.

2. A few (people) tried to spread their view on the story.

3. All tried to spread their view on the story.

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
anonymousWould you say all of these variations of sentence 1, which was "Both tried to spread their view on the story," are correct in conveying the sense of each having tried to spread his or her individual view on the story, among many others?

Yes. Any of those can convey that. It doesn't matter how many people are mentioned in the subject position — both, a few, several, a lot, every, all.

If it works for one of those choices, it works for all of them.

That's not to say that, depending on context, there may be better ways to convey the same idea. Examining isolated sentences in detail is not always the best way to learn a language. Emotion: smile

CJ

anonymous

Hi. Are they correct? Please see the underlined parts. Thank you in advance for your help.

1. Both tried to spread their view on the story.

2. Both tried to spread their views on the story.

3. Both tried to spread their individual views on the story.

CalifJim
anonymousAre they correct?

They are.

CJ

Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.