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There (is/are) a table, a chair, and a lamp in the room.

Do we use "is" or "are"?

thanks!
Comments  
There (is/are) a table, a chair, and a lamp in the room. --- If you see and, use plural.
BotirvoyThere (is/are) a table, a chair, and a lamp in the room.

Do we use "is" or "are"?

This topic has been discussed before in another thread.

There (is/are) a table, a chair, and a lamp in the room. (Either is acceptable in AmE.)

There (is) a table, a chair, and a lamp in the room. (In BrE, 'is' is the verb required.)

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Even though there are multiple items, the words are all singular which means they are seen as seperate items.

Thus "is" is used.
AnonymousEven though there are multiple items, the words are all singular which means they are seen as seperate items.

Thus "is" is used.

There is a table, a chair, and a lamp in the room. (In BrE, 'is' is the verb required.)
Even if the other nouns are plural, 'is' is the correct verb in the above sentence. 
There is a table, two chairs, and a lamp in the room. 
There is a table, a chair, and two lamps in the room.
When the first noun is plural 'are' is used. 
There are two tables, a chair, and a lamp in the room. 
In American English, "here" and "there" are not subjects.
In sentences beginning "here is/are" or "there is/are", the subject follows the verb and normal subject-verb agreement rules apply.
A lamp, a chair and a desk are in the room. (plural subject, joined by "and")

There are a lamp, a chair, and a desk in the room. (subject follows the verb).
British English has different rules. (described in previous postings in this thread)
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You are right. It is different in AmE. 
are

There's a table, a chair, and a lump in the room.

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