Hi,

Would you explain why "who" is being used here instead of "that or which"? Is it okay to personify things in English?

"Show me where there is a law who says I cannot dry my clothes in sunshine," she said.

Thank you,

m
No, but perhaps it is a part of the character's character. Is this from a piece of fiction?
Thank you for the reply and sorry for the late reply. I didn't realized until now that the emailing system had been updated and the default had been set "Disabled".

Anyway, this is a longer version of the piece.

Because I had always noticed this house, I found it re­ markable when, through the recommendation of a casual acquaintance, the new owner hired me to work three days a week as her personal assistant. Valencia was a striking, tightly wound Colombian woman with a closetful of short skirts and a Singular talent for appalling her neighbors. After paint­ ing the walnut-paneled library a screeching canary yellow, she strung a clothesline across the nineteenth-century wrought-iron balcony the former owner had brought up from New Orleans.

"Show me where there is a law who says I cannot dry my clothes in sunshine," she said, crumpling up one of the sev­ eral anonymous letters of complaint. "Maybe these people should just mind to their own business for one time in their life and leave me alone, my God."

The writer is David Sedaris, a humorist, and although he write stories based on what actually happened to him, one might say, "they are fiction" because of this very active imagination.

So, why do you think "who" is used? A part of the character's character?

Thank you always,

m
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So, why do you think "who" is used? A part of the character's character?-- Presumably, or at least her idiolect. She also says 'mind to their own business', which is not native English either.
I had misunderstood what you meant by "the character's character."

Thank you for the reply. Now it perfectly clear.Emotion: smile

m