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Hi

I have heard both. Do both of these sentences sound fully natural to you?

  1. There is a possibility that he will turn up again.
  2. There is possibility that he will turn up again.

Thanks,

Tom

Comments  

To me, the second sentence sounds more natural.

Suresh

Mr. TomI have heard both.

You should only listen to native speakers for such matters.

Mr. TomDo both of these sentences sound fully natural to you?

No, only number one.

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vsureshTo me, the second sentence sounds more natural.

I am sorry Tom. I felt the first one to be natural but while typing by mistake I mentioned it was the second sentence.

It was only after I saw the comment made the anon, I noticed the mistake I had made.

Thank you, anon.

Suresh

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Mr. TomPerhaps this is the reason I asked this question.

Yes, but most of those are about the concepts of 'possibility' and 'impossibility' in themselves, usually in a philosophical or quasi-philosophical context:

When there is possibility, there is impossibility, and when there is impossibility, there is possibility.

That's not the same as the ordinary use of "a/the possibility that (something will happen)".

You might say it is the "that-ness" that changes everything. Emotion: smile

CJ

CalifJimYes, but most of those are about the concepts of 'possibility' and 'impossibility' in themselves, usually in a philosophical or quasi-philosophical context:When there is possibility, there is impossibility, and when there is impossibility, there is possibility.

Very helpful addition. Thank you, CJ.