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There is / are a total of five cars.
Should it be 'is' or 'are'?

Thanks in advance.
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Yoong LiatThere is / are a total of five cars.
Should it be 'is' or 'are'?

Thanks in advance.
subject = total = is
Feebs11
Yoong LiatThere is / are a total of five cars.
Should it be 'is' or 'are'?

Thanks in advance.
subject = total = is
What about this? A total of five cars has/have been stolen.
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The subject is still "a total".

I think colloquially in spoken English you will hear the plural in these kinds of sentences - A total of five cars were stolen - but grammatically it is incorrect.
I think the proximity rules in this case, thus it depends on the order.
Hi Yoong,
I took a look at the Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English, and at "total" there is this example:
A total of thirteen meetings were held to discuss the issue.

I think you can use either a singual of plural verb, generally speaking. I think I'd treat "total" the same way as "group":

There is a group of people. (the group)
There is a total of five cars.
(the total)

A group of people were playing.
(the people)
A total of five cars were stolen.
(the cars)

That's the way I see it. Emotion: smile
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Hi Kooyeen

I agree with you.

Thanks for your effort.
You are absolutely correct!
Thanks sooo much
but Microsoft word suggests "There are a total of 100 ...".
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