+0
There is no more interesting way to learn local history than to know how your Dad and Mom lived and their Dad and Mom and their Aunts and Uncles and their cousins and so on and so on. Each new layer opens up a whole new world not so distant past and connected in some way to the researchers.


Is it possible to say 'There is not more interesting way to learn local history than...' , instead?
1 2
Comments  
Hi Taka,

You will want to get an explanation from an expert, but the simple answer to your question is that 'not more interesting way' is incorrect.

If you want to use the word 'not', then you could say:

There is not a more interesting way...

or...

There is not any more interesting way...
Thanks, davkett. But actually, the original is 'There is not more interesting way', as you can see here:

http://justlikedennis.com/genealogy.html

I've found another example:
There is not more beautiful time of year to visit. The river, the color is absolutely
glorious!


http://www.google.co.jp/url?sa=U&start=7&q=http://fvaa.info/wiapartments/Membersonlyinfo/newslett...

The sencond example is in print, so it is hardly a typo, I think.

Strictly, you can say it's grammatically wrong. But isn't it possible to call such usage 'colloquial'?
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Im going to say "No" to your question about 'colloquial', and also to say that published documents can certainly contain typos.
There is not more beautiful time of year to visit.


That's a typo; the correct English is:

There is no more beautiful a time of year to visit.

or

There is not a more beautiful time of year to visit.

Note the use of the indefinite article.
Hmm...OK, for now, I trust the comments from a native 'Pensilvanian'.Emotion: smile

Thank you, davkett!
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
OH, thank you too, Anglos.

Where are you from?
That's a typo; the correct English is:

There is no more beautiful a time of year to visit.

or

There is not a more beautiful time of year to visit.


And 'There is not any more beautiful time of year to visit', right?
That's 'Pennsylvanian'. (I know you are a 'detail person'.)
'Pensylvanian'.

Ah, that IS what I really call 'a typo'.Emotion: big smile
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Show more