Hi,
I'm writing a letter and running into this problem. Which sentence is correct: there is a number of research facilities at that university..., or there are a number of research facilities...?
Thank you so much,
J
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there r
Hi, I'm writing a letter and running into this problem. Which sentence is correct: there is a number of research facilities at that university...,or there are a number of research facilities...?

"are" in formal writing, but "is", often, in speech. The sentence does seem like a bit of truistic garbage though. How many universities can there be that don't have a "number" of "research facilities"? You could start by replacing the word "number" with... a number.
Adrian
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"are" in formal writing, but "is", often, in speech. The sentence does seem like a bit of truistic garbage though. How many universities can there be that don't have a "number" of "research facilities"?

It's only the beginning of the sentence. It could continue, 'that meet the criteria of blah blah blah'.

Paul
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I'm writing a letter and running into this problem. Which sentence is correct: there is a number of research facilities at that university..., or there are a number of research facilities...?

There are numerous research. . . .
There are many research. . . .
That university has numerous research. . . .
That university has many research. . . .
Hi, I'm writing a letter and running into this problem. ... that university..., or there are a number of research facilities...?

"are" in formal writing, but "is", often, in speech.

More to the point, "there are" in formal writing, but "there's", often, in speech. I don't think I'd expect to hear an uncontracted "there is" there.

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"are" in formal writing, but "is", often, in speech. The ... there be that don't have a "number" of "research facilities"?

It's only the beginning of the sentence. It could continue, 'that meet the criteria of blah blah blah'.

or even "in whatever field you're interested in".
My favorite recruiting tool told me that UQAM competes in all three major sports soccer, hockey and lacrosse. (Cross-reference "What's in a Name?" thread.)
Jon Miller
I'm writing a letter and running into this problem. Which ... that university..., or there are a number of research facilities...?

There are numerous research. . . .

Couldn't agree more: "numerous" is almost invariably better than "a number of".
(And using one word rather than three is never a bad thing.)

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 21 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey to whhvs)
J. W. Love wrote

There are numerous research. . . .

Couldn't agree more: "numerous" is almost invariably better than "a number of". (And using one word rather than three is never a bad thing.)

There are differences in meaning, though. "Numerous" means "a large number", not just "any number", implied by "a number of".

In other words, "numerous" is not almost invariably better than "a number of".

Skitt (in Hayward, California)
www.geocities.com/opus731/
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