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Hi,

I sometimes notice native speakers using ‘is’ where an ‘are’ should be used. For example, consider the sentence below. Why do they do that?

There is two ways of going about it.

Thanks,

MG.
Comments  
Though I am not a native, I consider it incorrect. And I'm not sure any teacher will approve of using it. As for the using of such constructions I really have no idea. It might be misspelling of some variety.
Hi MG

I'm afraid I've never come across that usage before, so could you possibly be thinking of the similar-sounding 'There's two ways of going about it', which is often heard? When 'there' is used that way, it's known as existential 'there'. 'There' occurs in the position normally taken up by the subject of a clause, but it's an 'empty' or 'dummy' theme. In informal speech, it often influences the form of the verb, causing singular concord (agreement) even where the verb is followed by a plural:

'There's some apples on the table', or 'There's two people waiting in reception' etc.

But this usage is criticised in writing, or in formal speech, where 'There are some apples on the table' or 'There are two ways of going about it' would be recommended.

BillJ
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MusicgoldI sometimes notice native speakers using ‘is’ where an ‘are’ should be used. For example, consider the sentence below. Why do they do that?



There is two ways of going about it.
It's very casual speech, and as mentioned above, the contracted form is more typical: There's two ways ....

CJ
Tnanks folks.
CalifJimThere's two ways ....
Jim, there's is " there is" or I'm getting the wrong end of the stick, aren't I?
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Fandorinthere's is " there is"
Yes. That's correct.

CJ
Thank you.