+0
Hello!

I'm writing a graduation thesis on "there" sentences, and I'd like you to tell me whether each sentence below is right or wrong.

If there are sentences which are possible under a certain situation, please give me an example of the situation.

a.There is the woman in the house.
b.There is the book on the table.
c.There is the book of linguistics on the table.
d.There was the shadow of a big dog in the park.
e.There's the possibility that John will come in time.
f.There's the possibility for John to go abroad.
g.There was never the problem in England.
h.In England there was never the problem that there was in America.
i.There was the surprising odor in the closet today.
j.There's the question to be answered at once.

I thank you in advance of your help.
+0
I can't remember the ESL terms! These sentences are all possible using the [existential] "there." The first one looks tempting as [demonstrative] "there" (pointing to the woman), but it's not really idiomatic. Edit. Rimbaud's is okay. (Well, I took it as looking through a photo album trying to identify a woman previously seen in the house.)

As [existential] "there," we could say, "Who are the likely suspects who could have committed the murder?" (reply) "Well, - - there's the woman in the house, for one."

Other attempts at reading these as [demonstrative] are possible, but each possibility seems like a stretch - that is, not idiomatic.
+0
Avangi is right on. Most times when we say "There is", the subject is used with the indefinite article. There is a book on the table; there is a woman in the house.
"The" is used only when the context indicates some definite person or thing.
There is the woman, in the house. (when you discover where "the woman" you have been talking about is) The comma is also natural punctuation, adding to the way we would inflect the sentence in speech..
Also, "There is the woman of the house." is natural. "The woman of the house" is an idiomatic phrase meaning the mistress of the household.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Comments  
All of these, except g, can be correct if said in the right way.
A. There's the woman in the house! (As if you were trying to find a woman in a picture of a house.)
B. (Have you seen any books around here?) There's the book on the table.
C. (Do you know where the book went?) There's a book of linguistics on the table.
D. There was the shadow of a big dog in the park. (A recall statement, perhaps?)
E. (What are the possibilites?) There's the possibility that John will come in time.
F. (What's John going to do after he gets out of school for the year?) There's the possibility for John to go abroad.
G. There was never the problem in England. (I can't think of any situation for this.)
H. (I think the sentence should be worded differently to sound better.) There was never the problem in England that there was in America.
I. (Another recall statement?) There was the odor in the closet today.
J. (A command from a teacher who's pointing at a sheet of paper as instruction.) There's the question to be answered at once!

I'm not sure if you can use this or if it's any help at all, but I wish you the best of luck!
 Avangi's reply was promoted to an answer.
 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.