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Is there any difference in meaning between the following sentences:

1: There is no thing called favour in politics.

2: There is no thing which is favour in politics.
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Neither sentence makes much sense to me, Jackson.

I assume that the first one is supposed to mean "There is no such thing as a favour in politics."
Both of your sentences make very little sense.

Do you mean to say “there is no such thing as favor in politics”?

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Hi Goodman

What part of speech is your "favor"? A verb?

In my sentence, favor is a noun and the intended meaning is that nobody really does anyone a favor/any favors in politics. In other words, in politics "favors" are not done as "free-of-charge acts of goodwill" (the usual definition of a favor). "Favors" in politics are not really favors -- they must be paid back.
Hi Amy,

I am mystified by your question. “Favor” of course is a noun. What else can it be, besdies hands of politicians scratching each other backs? What I said was a “figure of speech” and was not what it intended to mean. I think there is a dicconnect somewhere along the line here. Are we on the same wave length?Emotion: big smile
Hi Goodman

Well, favor is a verb, too.
I suppose it was the lack of an article in front of 'favor' that caused the line to break up.Emotion: wink
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<<Do you mean to say “there is no such thing as favor in politics”? >> This is what I said in general.

I didn't see a need for article in front of "favor", and I realized "favor" can be used in verb form but not in this context. Perhaps, in retrospec, it may be improved by adding an "a" in front of "thing".

Do you mean to say “there is no such a thing as favor in politics”? What do you think?
GoodmanDo you mean to say “there is no such a thing as favor in politics”? What do you think?
What I wrote in my first post was "There is no such thing as a favor in politics". Since you wrote something almost identical after that post, but nevertheless slightly different, I thought you were disagreeing with something...
Hi Amy,

Seeing things in different shades of light does not mean disagreeing. It gave me an opportunity to look at the same thing from differnt angles. Cheers
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