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Dear Friends,

As I know, 'there's no point to' is generally followed by the gerund. In Art Company's Susanna, however, they sing:

"There's no point to start again."

Is the infinitive acceptable too?

Palinkasocsi
Comments  
Only "there's not point in doing that" sounds good to me. Others may be able to verify the correctness of "point to".
PhilipOnly "there's no point in doing that" sounds good to me
Hi,
That's exactly what I was taught. Emotion: smile
However, sometimes I do read there's no point (without "in"). Does this sound natural and correct to you?
I guess it's fine in colloquial speech, but am not sure about that. Also, how about formal writing? Would it be a no-no?

Many thanks!
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Palinkasocsi"There's no point to start again."

Is the infinitive acceptable too?
If the meaning is

There is no point (step in a process) at which we can start again.

then the infinitive is acceptable.

It is not acceptable in the usual idiomatic meaning:

It makes no sense to start again.

Songs occasionally bend the rules of grammar based on the number of syllables needed in a given line of the lyrics. That may be what is happening. More context might permit a better analysis.

CJ
Tanit
PhilipOnly "there's no point in doing that" sounds good to me
Hi,
That's exactly what I was taught.
However, sometimes I do read there's no point (without "in"). Does this sound natural and correct to you?
I guess it's fine in colloquial speech, but am not sure about that. Also, how about formal writing? Would it be a no-no?

Many thanks!

In is optional, at least in casual speech.
PhilipIn is optional, at least in casual speech.
Thank you very much. Emotion: smile
I'll pay attention to it in formal writing, then!
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Thanks for the suggestions. As I feel from your answers, it is not safe (usual) to use the infinitive with 'there's no point'.

Take care,

Palinkasocsi