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Sorry, you have to look under "agere" it's the future passive participle.

Oh, right, I have to have a Latin dictionary.

Oops, I forgot to mention that.

He could feel the creature inside his mind and taste its dank, ghastly breath as it breathed through his mouth. (G.P. Taylor)
... There's a reason it's called Concise. The singular form ... it would have been redundant to spell it out. ¬R

That may once have been the case.

It's still the case, for anyone with a decent education.

BW
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"All right" is correct and "alright" is all wrong.

Hello, George. I would like to disagree with that. I think both have their place. Thy mean (to me) two different things.

Me too. alright = wrong; all right = right.
Alright? Even if it's not all right. (I made a typo "thy" which is obviously not correct.)

Typos are understood, even though "thy" is a correct word.

GFH
Oh, right, I have to have a Latin dictionary.

Or passing familiarity with such English words as "addendum," "bacterium," and "medium." Next you'll be telling us you should be able to use an English dictionary without knowing any English words at all.

Joe Bay: "Yeah, I raised the price of that bizarre pervert Stanford University magazine you like to fifty bucks. And we're the Dept. of Cancer Biology only store that carries it." >>> http://users.bestweb.net/~notr/cosmic.html >>> ¬R
Or passing familiarity with such English words as "addendum," "bacterium," and "medium." Next you'll be telling us you should be able to use an English dictionary without knowing any English words at all.

What you say!!!
"Medium" is an adjective ("between small and large"). Them other words are just funny technical jargon.

Vielen Dank
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Oh, right, I have to have a Latin dictionary.

Or passing familiarity with such English words as "addendum," "bacterium," and "medium." Next you'll be telling us you should be able to use an English dictionary without knowing any English words at all.

The only way to win is not to play.
oTTo
It's still the case, for anyone with a decent education.

No, the Concise isn't the one in the case. That's the Condensed, with the little drawer up top for the magnifying glass.

http://users.bestweb.net/~notr/bluemoon.html / I haven't laughed ¬R / so hard since I was waiting to see 'The Aristocrats!' Cam
That may once have been the case.

It's still the case, for anyone with a decent education.

I don't think it's the case. If I had to guess the singular of agenda I'd guess agendum, but not confidently. I mean, we all know the singular of opera, right? A look through http://en.wikipedia.org/Latin declension reveals that the singular of conamina is conamen, the singular of animalia is animal, and the singular of cornua is cornu. Those are all regular, as near as I can tell.
Ben
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Agendum, obviously.

How is that obvious? It's not in my dictionary.

The word "gullible" isn't in a single dictionary, either, but people still use it all the time. So what's your point?
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