1 6 7 8  10 11 12 15
On 05 Oct 2006, Darla Vladschyk wrote Or even not. ... the singular easily deducible (and therefore 'obvious', to my mind).

Just between you and me, of course I knew what it was. For some strange reason probably related to a sense of sympathy for the beginners and non-native speakers, I objected to the statement that it was obvious. Let's just say not obvious to everyone.

I can do that.
"Not obvious to everyone."
C'mere and sing "Kum-Ba-Ya" with me, you big lug!
BW
Just between you and me, of course I knew what ... it was obvious. Let's just say not obvious to everyone.

I can do that. "Not obvious to everyone." C'mere and sing "Kum-Ba-Ya" with me, you big lug! BW

I'll sing with you, but anything but that. I'm a musician too.

Stephen
Lennox Head, Australia
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I can do that. "Not obvious to everyone." C'mere and sing "Kum-Ba-Ya" with me, you big lug!

I'll sing with you, but anything but that. I'm a musician too.

Okay, then, how about "Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round the Old Oak Tree"?

BW
I'll sing with you, but anything but that. I'm a musician too.

Okay, then, how about "Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round the Old Oak Tree"? BW

Okay, serves me right. I did say "anything but.."

Stephen
Lennox Head, Australia
Yes; pleasantly. You have obviously avoided unpleasant encounters with lamp-posts, but what sort of reactions do you generally get as a consequence of such uses?

People who know me are not surprised in the least, others may hesitate while they stop and think about what the unfamiliar word might possibly mean. Nobody has ever stopped me and asked "what do you mean by that?" .. because, of course, it's obvious.

What a pleasant bit of news to round off an otherwise generally unpleasant day (but at least the Dodgers lost).
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
(Oh, and "octopi" was never a plural form of octopus ... "octopodes" as a pedantic and now-deprecated but technically passable form.)

If octopodes is the plural of octopus, then the singular of antipodes is antipus.

While I realize (or hope) that you write in jest, the point is not without interest. The singular "antipode" derives from the plural "antipodes", which my trusty desk dictionary informs me in turn derives from the Greek plural form of the singular "antipous", the plural signifying "with feet opposite", "podes" presumably (to one with zero knowledge of Greek) signifying "feet", with singular "pous" being the word ending up as "pus" in the English "octopus" (which, apparently, translates as "eight-footed"). The plural of "octopus" is therefore "octopodes", as stated.
"Antipode" as the singular of "antipodes" does not follow in the pattern because it is parallel to the Zen koan "What is the sound of one hand clapping?" Antipodes are points diametrically opposite on a sphere: anti podes, feet opposite; what, exactly, an "antipode" a "foot opposite" (opposite what?) ought to be is not so very clear. It appears that that unusual word means something like "that point which, when taken with the point under considerations, is one of the antipodes so defined".
There is a generic "octopod" in English, a term that subsumes the octpuses and the "paper nautilus", and possibly some others; I presume its plural is simply "octopods".
I like the joke about "gullible" though.

Joke? It's not in my dictionary. (But there are a few pages missing.)

When Toad found himself immured in a dank and noisome dungeon, ... he flung himself at full length on the floor, and shed bitter tears, and abandoned himself to dark despair. (Kenneth Grahame)
I was using the lack of an entry in the ... was "obvious" as claimed. I think that's a reasonable criterion.

People often ask me what's on my agendum for today ;-)

Lucky you! I usually have several things I have to do every day.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
I like the joke about "gullible" though.

Joke? It's not in my dictionary. (But there are a few pages missing.)

That's incredible, I don't believe you. What do you think I am?

Stephen
Lennox Head, Australia
Show more