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These are two very different faces of the Lantern Festival in Taiwan. So, whichever appeals to your personality, you can head either north or south this year to join in the fun and festivities.

I wonder if I could replace "faces" in the above with "aspects/ways" without making a change in meaning?

Besides, is "in" within the bolded phrase dispensable? Thanks.
Comments  
AngliholicThese are two very different faces of the Lantern Festival in Taiwan. So, whichever appeals to your personality, you can head either north or south this year to join in the fun and festivities.

I wonder if I could replace "faces" in the above with "aspects/ways" without making a change in meaning?

Besides, is "in" within the bolded phrase dispensable? Thanks. It is not necessary.
How about "styles" instead of "faces"?
Philip
Angliholic
These are two very different faces of the Lantern Festival in Taiwan. So, whichever appeals to your personality, you can head either north or south this year to join in the fun and festivities.

I wonder if I could replace "faces" in the above with "aspects/ways" without making a change in meaning?

Besides, is "in" within the bolded phrase dispensable? Thanks. It is not necessary.

How about "styles" instead of "faces"?
Thanks, Philip.

Styles sounds good to me, but do my suggestions do the trick?
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Angliholic
Philip
Angliholic
These are two very different faces of the Lantern Festival in Taiwan. So, whichever appeals to your personality, you can head either north or south this year to join in the fun and festivities.

I wonder if I could replace "faces" in the above with "aspects/ways" without making a change in meaning?

Besides, is "in" within the bolded phrase dispensable? Thanks. It is not necessary.

How about "styles" instead of "faces"?
Thanks, Philip.

Styles sounds good to me, but do my suggestions do the trick?
They don't sound good to me.
Philip
Angliholic
Philip
Angliholic
These are two very different faces of the Lantern Festival in Taiwan. So, whichever appeals to your personality, you can head either north or south this year to join in the fun and festivities.

I wonder if I could replace "faces" in the above with "aspects/ways" without making a change in meaning?

Besides, is "in" within the bolded phrase dispensable? Thanks. It is not necessary.

How about "styles" instead of "faces"?
Thanks, Philip.

Styles sounds good to me, but do my suggestions do the trick?

They don't sound good to me.
Thanks, Philip.

Got it.

By the way, I didn't notice that you had answered the "in" part until just now. The original does include "in" in the context, but you said it's not necessary. This is really confusing. Could you explain why it's not necessary?
Angliholic
Philip
Angliholic
Philip
Angliholic
These are two very different faces of the Lantern Festival in Taiwan. So, whichever appeals to your personality, you can head either north or south this year to join in the fun and festivities.

I wonder if I could replace "faces" in the above with "aspects/ways" without making a change in meaning?

Besides, is "in" within the bolded phrase dispensable? Thanks. It is not necessary.

How about "styles" instead of "faces"?
Thanks, Philip.

Styles sounds good to me, but do my suggestions do the trick?

They don't sound good to me.
Thanks, Philip.

Got it.

By the way, I didn't notice that you had answered the "in" part until just now. The original does include "in" in the context, but you said it's not necessary. This is really confusing. Could you explain why it's not necessary?
Join, join in, it's all the same.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Thanks, Philip.

But as far as my knowlge of "join" and "join in" goes, their meanings and uses are not the same.

For instances,

May I join you? But not "May I join in you."

I want to join in their activity. But not "I want to join their activity."
AngliholicThanks, Philip.

But as far as my knowlge of "join" and "join in" goes, their meanings and uses are not the same.

For instances,

May I join you? But not "May I join in you."

I want to join in their activity. But not "I want to join their activity."
Yes, there is that distinction. I was answering only about the situation in question.