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"The individuals that ran Skyline should not ever be in charge of a nursing home again, and yet here we are," said David Grabowski, a professor of health care policy at Harvard Medical School. He said the pandemic exposed an industry already in crisis, with a lack of resources and regulation.

"Different names, same practices," Grabowski said. "We need to ensure that there aren’t these kind of back doors, that nursing homes aren’t able to simply put a new name on the building and continue to operate as is."

(NBC News.)

Is the determiner these in grammatical agreement with the head in the NP these kind of back doors?

Is the "it" implied in the clause "as is" (as [it] is)?

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anonymousIs the determiner these in grammatical agreement with the head in the NP these kind of back doors?

No. It should be these kinds. This is proof that even native speakers sometimes make mistakes. Emotion: smile


According to the usage note at the entry for 'kind' in the Concise Oxford English Dictionary (2011),

With these or those, speaking of more than one kind, use a plural construction: these kinds of changes were observed in several species. The use of these kind (i.e., with kind in the singular), as in these kind of questions are not relevant, is ungrammatical and should be avoided.

anonymousIs the "it" implied in the clause "as is" (as [it] is)?

I suppose it is, but we've come to take "as is" as an idiom for "without change". Only occasionally do we see "it" included (as it is), as in the last example below.

Found online:

Can the farmer use his property for anything else or does it have to stay as is?
Forty-four percent preferred that the health care law be expanded or left as is.
Despite Microsoft's claims, most people think Google works pretty well as it is.

CJ

Comments  
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Kind is an old irregular plural, which persists and has been used in expressions like these kind of books even by educated speakers. I suppose it is slowly becoming obsolete, though. Or perhaps I should say that more and more object to this irregular plural of kind.

CB

Cool BreezeI suppose it is slowly becoming obsolete, though.

Actually, Google's Ngram Viewer shows the usage of 'these kind' increasingslightly over the last 50 years. Emotion: surprise

Nevertheless, 'these kinds' is used much, much more often.

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=these+kinds%2Cthese+kind&year_start=1800&year_end=2019&corpus=26&smoothing=3&direct_url=t1%3B%2Cthese%20kinds%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cthese%20kind%3B%2Cc0#t1%3B%2Cthese%20kinds%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cthese%20kind%3B%2Cc0

CJ