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They have to try out each class to see which one suits them best.

They have to audit each class to see which one fits them best.

They have to give it try in each class to see which one is proper for them.

Hi,

I have some friends who want to take an English conversation class in a cram school. Do all of the above versions do the trick if they want to make sure which class they should go to? Thanks.
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They have to try out each class to see which one suits them best.
Try out is for competitions, IMO, but it seems to work for others.

Definitely not audit. That's for accounting.

They have to give it a try in each class to see which one is proper for them.
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Marius Hancu
They have to try out each class to see which one suits them best.
Try out is for competitions, IMO, but it seems to work for others.

Definitely not audit. That's for accounting.

They have to give it a try in each class to see which one is proper for them.
In the States, many usniverities and colleges will allow people to "sit in" on the class, for no fee [or for a reduced fee]. The student receives no credit for the class, and the instructor is not required to read any papers or exams written by the observer. This is 'to audit' [hear] a class. The term may or may not be applicable to the original question here.

I must agree with your stiking of 'out' in the one sentence. That is an unnecessary word that just clutters the thought. It's probably because we often "try out" for something, such as the cheer squad, which also seems unnecessary to me. But we do have the word "try-outs". But I digress.
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Comments  
Philip is right:
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audit

transitive verb

1 : to examine and verify (as the books of account of a company or a treasurer's accounts)

2 : to attend (a course especially in a college or university) without working for or expecting to receive formal credit


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